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Would an "indoor" pool of water on the Moon or on Mars behave differently than on Earth? Would the waves caused by a splash be higher or lower? Would they propagate faster or slower? Would boyance be different? And what would it be like to shower in slowly falling water?

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2 Answers 2

Would an "indoor" pool of water on the Moon or on Mars behave differently than on Earth? Depends on what you are observing.

Would the waves caused by a splash be higher or lower? The waves would be higher.

Would they propagate faster or slower? They would propagate at the same rate.

Would boyance be different? No, because buoyancy depends on the displacement of mass.

what would it be like to shower in slowly falling water? How can anyone here answer this since only a few people (<0.001%) have experienced this.

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Has anyone showered in partial gravity??? Higher waves and same propagation speed, that means steeper waves, right? –  LocalFluff Apr 2 at 3:30
    
I would think that the astronauts showered when they were on the space station. Yes, the waves would be steeper, but remember that there is less gravity so it won't be better for surfing. –  LDC3 Apr 2 at 3:55
    
Hi LDC3 It would be really good if you could explain why in your answer. For example, why would the waves be higher? Why would they propagate at the same rate? Thanks in advance –  RhysW Apr 7 at 12:28
    
#RhysW I will need to research this. I will get to it after work. –  LDC3 Apr 7 at 13:29
    
@RhysW I couldn't find any supporting documents, but here is what I think. The waves are taller because there is less gravity. Less gravity means less force pulling on the waves, so they end up being taller. The waves propagate at the same rate because the speed and frequency of the wave is the same and is dependent on the density of the medium (like light waves going from air to water changes the speed, but not the frequency). –  LDC3 Apr 8 at 1:15
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With regard to buoyancy: The buoyant force (in Newtons) on a partially or totally submerged body depends on the volume of fluid displaced (in $meters^3$) , the density of the fluid (in $kilograms/meter^3$) , and the local acceleration of gravity (in $meter/second^2$).

Of course, the force of gravity on the object itself will depend on the local acceleration of gravity. So:

  1. A substance that floats in a particular liquid on earth will float in the same liquid on the moon, or Mars;

  2. A substance that sinks in a particular liquid on earth will sink in the same liquid on the moon, or Mars;

  3. A body of some substance that floats immersed to a certain depth in some liquid on Earth will float at the same depth in that liquid on the moon or Mars.

BUT

The external force needed to make an object submerge or keep it submerged will be less on the moon than on earth

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