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As far as I know we stick to the surface of the Earth as its gravity is pulling us and Earth rotation is in a way reducing the gravity.

At what speed should Earth be spinning so that we all get ejected / catapulted into space (if we all line up on the equator).

Sub question: at what speed of spinning would we all “stick” a few meters above the ground?

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closed as off-topic by Eduardo Serra, called2voyage May 7 at 18:29

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions about Earth science, unless directly related to phenomena observable on other celestials, Solar system in general of which Earth is a part, or as an origin of observational astronomy where its movement, local/global phenomena might affect observations and measurements, is off-topic. For more information, see the meta discussion." – Eduardo Serra, called2voyage
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
gajba, I would recommend asking this question on Physics.SE if you're still interested (assuming it hasn't already been answered there). –  called2voyage May 7 at 18:32
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@called2voyage I don't understand why it's off topic. A similar question has been asked before on Astronomy.SE. See this –  Yashbhatt May 8 at 5:17
    
@Yashbhatt Thanks for bringing that to my attention. –  called2voyage May 8 at 12:12
    
@Yashbhatt If you read the text in the close reason, it should become apparent to you why this question is off-topic. –  called2voyage May 8 at 12:14
    
@called2voyage It says "local/global phenomena might affect observations and measurements". The earth coming to a standstill or rotating fast enough to throw us off the surface is surely an observational phenomena. –  Yashbhatt May 8 at 12:19
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