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When matter crosses the event horizon, it is easy to imagine that matter is torn apart into their individual components by tidal wave effects. Atoms would be ripped apart eventually.

At one time, the particles will fall so deep into the gravity well, that a single particle would be touching both sides of the gravity well at the same time. At that moment, I choose to assume that the particle particle core may be spaghettified, but externally it will appear to be shrinking.

Knowing that spaghettification is dependent on the size of the object, as well as the difference in gravity on both sides, a shrinking particle may eventually become so small that the steepness of the gravity well is no longer a problem.

The particle continues to shrink forever. Over time, gravity between all the particles that have shrunk, will again start to take effect - and I imagine that that is what happened in the big bang.

So the cosmic inflation, could just as well be particle shrinking, as a result of all particles in our universe being within the same black superhole.

Taking this idea, we could look at our own universe and I guess we would expect to see certain effects such as accelerating cosmic expansion, perhaps a cosmic background radiation and we would expect our universe to end as a cold, dead place.

Is this a known theory or idea, and where can I find papers on it?

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I'm pretty sure many of the extremely well educated astro*/cosmo* people on this site will tell me that this is a stupid idea, either because it's just speculation - or because nothing suggests that it is true. I've asked a lot of questions and nothing so far suggests to me it's NOT a viable direction to explore, if I were to try to take a PhD Cosmology. –  frodeborli May 14 at 13:46
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"matter has lost entropy and has been reset"- Do you have anything supporting this statement? –  Yashbhatt May 14 at 13:52
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"As this matter continues to travel down the gravity well, the tidal effects of gravity will average out" — due to what? They just get stronger and stronger up to the singularity. Also, I don't think this is on-topic for this site because none of it is observable. Physics would be a better forum. –  Blackbody Blacklight May 14 at 13:55
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@frodeborli No, the closer you get to the singularity, the harder it rips you apart. Imaginative, but whatever you're thinking of is not a black hole. –  Blackbody Blacklight May 14 at 14:15
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This whole thing is an incoherent mess that does not define its main parts properly, does not conceptually connect them, and does not even identify what problems the idea is supposed to solve. ... Yes, it is "possible to agree" that entropy "might" be "reset"; actually, that part is what happens in the classical description of black holes. But that's widely regarded as the major problem with the classical description of black holes! –  Stan Liou May 15 at 4:48

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Let's say you have a rocket near a Schwarzschild black hole. Near the horizon, the thrust required to keep stationary goes to infinity; in this specific sense, the gravitational force becomes infinite at the horizon. If the rocket is hovering above the horizon, then the difference in gravitational forces becomes arbitrarily large near the horizon. This can tear it apart. However, an object falling into the black hole will also gain a velocity arbitrarily close to the speed of light (as measured by a stationary observer as it passes) as it gets closer to the horizon, meaning it will be length-contracted. It shrinks to zero size. As a result, the difference in 'gravitational force' across it is more complicated, and in fact remains finite.

Knowing that spaghettification is dependent on the size of the object, as well as the difference in gravity on both sides, a shrinking particle may eventually become so small that the steepness of the gravity well is no longer a problem.

A shrinking object tames the infinite 'gravitational force' and keeps the tidal forces finite. But the curvature is already defined in the limit of the size of the measurement probe tending to zero. (The static tidal forces correspond to six of the twenty independent curvature components, but let's not worry about that much.) So no, you can't 'get rid of curvature' by shrinking your particle/system/whatever. That's conceptually broken.

Is this a known theory or idea, and where can I find papers on it?

You would have to have a much clearer idea before that can be answered reasonably. I've skipped all the way to the end of your question because I haven't understood anything more of what you're trying to say.

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