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I did a bit of googling but couldn't find the exact answer, so are the following 3 points collinear or not ?

1_center of earth

2_ascending(or descending) node of sun

3_point of intersection of prime meridian and equator(point of zero longitude on equator).

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No. They can align at some special times, though. Why do you think they should be collinear? –  Cheeku Jul 20 at 23:46
    
its not possible, all these points are stationary w.r.t to earth,, so they all remain collinear or never get aligned, they can't be aligned at some times and not at other times, –  Salman Azmat Jul 21 at 5:12
    
The ascending node of the sun is not stationary w.r.t the earth. The earth rotates, so the prime meridian rotates, meaning that the intersection of it and the equator also rotates. The vernal equinox, which is the ascending node of the sun, is fixed in the sky (at least on small timescales), and hence it does not rotate. –  Takku Jul 21 at 16:01
    
oh, right, I meant to ask that at the time when sun passes through vernal equinox does these points get aligned ? –  Salman Azmat Jul 21 at 16:19
    
@SalmanAzmat: Not exactly. During either equinox there is a moment when the line between center of earth and the sun aligns with the equator (as opposed to just crossing it twice daily), and if it happens the sun is in zenith above prime meridian at that moment, your conditions will be satisfied. But depending on precision you allow, that may be a very short time window. It's all about how precisely you want that to be. Each equinox the line crosses the prime meridian within about 0.25 degree of latitude, or about 27 kilometers from equator. Some years it's less, some - more. –  SF. Jul 22 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

Not exactly.

During either of the equinoxes there is a moment when the line between center of earth and the sun aligns with the equator (as opposed to just crossing it twice daily). This doesn't coincide with prime meridian in any way though; it may happen at any meridian whatsoever that happens to coincide with the line.

Of course if it happens the sun is in zenith above prime meridian at that moment, your conditions will be satisfied. But depending on precision you allow, that may be a very short time window. It's all about how precisely you want that to be.

Near Equinox Earth tilts by about 0.25 degree of latitude per day, meaning that is the maximum angle by which the line will be off from equator while crossing the prime meridian on the same day as when Equinox happens. 0.25 degree of latitude is about 27 kilometers, so this is the maximum error. Of course on some years, that will be much less, it's just that Earth tilt is correlated with length of year, zenith line crossing of prime meridian is correlated with time of day, and time of day is not really correlated with length of year.

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