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where can a gallery of actual unaltered photographic images taken in (or of) space be found? Specifically ones that are untouched, not colorized (not necessarily black and white), and taken by natural light photography? Pictures and videos claiming "actual image" are few and far between.

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Lots of amateur astrophotography can be found here: reddit.com/r/astrophotography –  asawyer Aug 7 at 13:47

3 Answers 3

I guess, this is among the best you can find: Hubble Heritage.

These are visible picture, real, and not modified, taken from space, and super-amazing.

If you meant pictures in wavelengths other than visible, please just ask.

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That's not quite true. They are composite images from multiple filters. Here's how they are actually made hubblesource.stsci.edu/services/articles/2005-02-10. –  Aaron Aug 8 at 22:29
    
Yep, all Hubble pictures don't count. Nice site though. –  Mazura Aug 8 at 22:57
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Of course, they are optimized. Yet, there is no fabrication. The images are real. –  Py-ser Aug 29 at 7:48

You may find unaltered images difficult to obtain. Firstly, most images are made from a combination of many short exposures, leading to the colours being 'built up'. Secondly, all but the newest astrophotographers tend to use imaging devices which are more sensitive to the IR part of the spectrum. Further to this, many will use filters to accentuate H - alpha regions, further obscuring 'true' colour.

The reason that these techniques are used is to aid you, the viewer. Unedited images are often grey, faint and show little detail.

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Indeed. Perhaps I should of asked what probes even had real cameras on them. Mars rover, Voyager 1,2 and...? –  Mazura Aug 8 at 22:59
    
Most spacecraft which visit astronomical bodies have a "real" camera on them of some kind. Every lander I can think of, all of the sun-staring probes, Galileo, Opportunity & Spirit, Juno... I'd say it's more unusual NOT to have such a camera on a probe. The question is often 'how accessible is the data from such a camera'. Sometimes cameras will not be intended for generating useful data, but are aids to navigation, targeting, calibration etc of other instruments. –  Guy Stimpson Sep 4 at 14:19

You can use one of the digital sky surveys. Examples include:

Their images contain visible (red or blue) wavelengths as well as infrared. All images are monochromatic, as are almost all professional astronomy photographs. You could build your own composite color image from the different channels.

Here is an example image from the ESO DSS2 archive in red wavelength:

enter image description here

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