Questions about the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe.

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Population of excited H levels in a Strömgren Sphere

In chapter 2.2 of Astrophysics of Gaseous Nebulae and AGN Ostriker and Ferland claim that, as far as ionization is concerned, one can assume all atoms to be in the ground state in a Strömgren Sphere ...
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1answer
159 views

Why does lithium fuse at lower temperatures than hydrogen?

This is a basic question, but it's been bugging me. In the Wikipedia article for lithium burning, it states that: Stars, which by definition must achieve the high temperature (2.5 × 10^6 K) ...
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1answer
81 views

How are stellar elemental abundances quoted?

Close to the bottom of page 4 of this article (marked as page 164 in the upper left corner) states Values are given in the logarithmic scale usually adopted by astronomers, A$_{e\ell}$ = log N$_{...
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1answer
80 views

If there are neutron stars, would most stars be considered “proton stars”?

For example, the Sun is a giant sphere of positively charged plasma. About 72% of the elements in it are protium. This means that these protium atoms would have had to lose their electrons, right? If ...
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1answer
42 views

Why does hydrogen ionization happen in HII regions?

Why does hydrogen ionization happen in HII regions? Why is the hydrogen there ionized?
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1answer
41 views

Could evaporating hot Jupiters have metallic hydrogen on their surfaces?

Jupiter is believed to have metallic hydrogen in its core. And gas giants that migrate to become hot Jupiters are believed to evaporate, have their atmospheres blown away by their nearby star. Can ...
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1answer
84 views

Are hot stars like O-type stars entirely composed of helium?

Hot stars like O-type stars show no hydrogen in their spectra. Does this mean they are made entirely of helium? Any explanation would be really helpful.
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What are the implications if the Sun was formed in a warm nebula?

Molecular oxygen O2 has been found on comet 67P/C-G in a ratio of 3.8% to water, which is much higher than expected. An explanation proposed is that the Solar System formed from a molecular cloud ...
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340 views

Why are there no green stars?

There are red stars, and orange stars, and yellow stars, and blue stars, and they are all understandable save the fact that there is a 'gap': There are no green stars. Is this because of hydrogen's ...
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1answer
135 views

Is the sun too small to self-ignite?

I recently heard in a discussion that the sun is not massive enough to self-ignite via core-pressure. It simply has not enough mass to "generate" the gravitational force needed for that. The reason ...
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2answers
196 views

What is the minimum size of a ball of gas to become a star?

I know there are two criteria to meet in order for nuclear fusion to occurs. High temperature (many times temperature at Sun's core) High pressure (protons are very close to each other) [Goal] ...
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377 views

Is there enough hydrogen left after a star dies so another star will have enough to light up?

A star consumes quite a lot of hydrogen in its life, and is pretty much "vacuuming" everything in its vicinity. After it dies (eventually by supernova which will spread all its composition over light ...
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1answer
196 views

In the end what is the ultimate matter/element in the universe, due to fusion process in stars?

We know that, in stars, hydrogen is used by the stars and due to the fusion in two hydrogen elements we get helium -> Carbon -> Oxygen ->Other elements -> Iron -> then Super/Hypernova. If everywhere ...
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74 views

Density of hydrogen between galaxies

From watching a video on youtube, it states that Dark Matter is 6 times more abundant than known matter. I was wondering if it was possible to have hydrogen clouds between the universes galaxies. The ...
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161 views

Could dark matter particles be unstable?

Is it possible that dark matter particles are unstable and the existing dark matter will decay in the long run and turn into hydrogen, for example? What would be possible mechanisms for such a decay? ...