Questions regarding telescopes in orbit around Earth, such as the Hubble Space Telescope.

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3
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4answers
135 views

Would space-based telescopes need to remain in the shadow of Earth to avoid light interference from the sun?

So I am thinking about orbiting telescopes tonight and I was thinking that it would probably be beneficial to keep them in the shadow of the Earth or some other space body to avoid light interference. ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Where can I find the DR12 SDSS dataset in their website

I have to cross-match the SDSS DR12 dataset with that of GALEX but apparently I cannot find the fits document which has the same field as that in GALEX. I have explored the website but I couldn't find ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Could the Earth be used to cast an arago/poisson spot on something

There's a potential design for a space-based telescope that uses a large opaque circular disk in place of a transparent lens to focus light for analysis. It uses the light that bends around the disk ...
15
votes
1answer
202 views

Why does a mirror bent 'like a potato chip' allow space telescopes to be smaller and have a wider field of view?

I was browsing NASA featured items and came across this - Out With the Old, In With the New: Telescope Mirrors Get New Shape Called freeform optics, this emerging mirror technology, brought about ...
7
votes
1answer
217 views

Theoretically, what is the biggest optical telescope that may exist?

Recently, I read yet another news about E-ELT. It will have 39.3-metre-diameter segmented primary mirror. And I was interested in the next question: Theoretically, what size of the primary mirror (...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

What is the cost and benefit of building two identical telescopes?

I suppose that (especially space) telescope costs is dominated by design and development, not by material and manufacturing. So once a telescope has been developed and designed, how much extra would ...
5
votes
1answer
57 views

What visual artifacts are expected from the JWST?

What visual artifacts should we expect from the images that will be released from the James Webb Space Telescope? Specifically, do we expect 3-pronged diffraction spikes (any preview how they would ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

What measure should I use to help optimise the design of a telescope in a cubesat?

I have started a project in Melbourne, Australia called nanosat eye in the sky to put a telescope in a cubesat and put it in LEO. The idea is then to add the telescope to itelescope. I need to learn ...
4
votes
1answer
70 views

Could spy satellites use laser guide stars (for adaptive optics)?

Are sodium lasers useful for Earth observing space telescopes/spy satellites?
4
votes
1answer
306 views

How to calculate the limiting magnitude of Hubble?

I've found various sources on the web stating that the limiting apparent magnitude of the Hubble Space Telescope is about 31 or 31.5. Wikipedia lists that here and it has a cite to a pdf about it. ...
5
votes
2answers
413 views

Are space telescopes completely out of the earth's atmosphere?

Is the Hubble Space Telescope, and every other space telescope for that matter, completely outside the Earths atmosphere?
3
votes
2answers
33 views

How is the cost of JWST distributed on different parts of development and operations?

The James Webb Space Telescope costs nearly 9 billion dollar. What parts of this project cost how much? I suppose that almost every component has to be developed and is not available to buy off the ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

Can ground based telescopes use a starshade in space?

1) Could a starshade in orbit be used by ground based telescopes? If so, what kind of orbit should it have? 2) Could the same starshade be used by two different space telescopes, or does the ...
3
votes
0answers
129 views

Is there a cosmic, rather than technological, upper limit to what a telescope can resolve?

Space radio interferometers could have a baseline of millions of kilometers, but is there a point where a larger baseline doesn't improve the resolution anymore because the photons observed are ...
7
votes
0answers
128 views

Method to determine the amount of reflected starlight necessary for an exoplanet to be visible from a given distance/angle?

What is the method to determine the amount of reflected starlight necessary for an exoplanet to be visible from a given distance/angle? (Not from occlusion but actually visible on its own.) Further, ...
-1
votes
1answer
68 views

As of now did a radio telescope ever recorded something else than the silence of space? [closed]

When a radio telescope listen to the Universe; a constant sound is recorded. Is it the noise "of the mic" : interferences? Scientists says that when they will notice variations on this basic constant ...
5
votes
2answers
79 views

Could a space radio telescope fill multiple purposes?

Dream for a while and imagine that there will be a flagship+ mission within a decade to put a large radio telescope in space: What kind of different tasks could the same radio equipment feasibly be ...
5
votes
2answers
108 views

Can the Gaia telescope detect small temporarily captured asteroids near its Lagrange orbit?

The Gaia space telescope is in a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth Lagrange point 2. The orbit period is about 180 days and the size of the orbit is 263,000 x 707,000 x 370,000 km. It has been ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Telescope in Sun's gravity lens focus - pointing, gain, distortions

A telescope located in the gravitational focus of the Sun can use the Sun as a magnifying lens. The focus begins 550 AU away, but maybe a 700 or 1000 AU distance is needed to get rid of disturbances ...
2
votes
1answer
242 views

What are the differences between TESS and PLATO exoplanet telescopes?

Within a year now it has been decided to launch TESS in 2017 and PLATO in 2024, space telecopes of NASA and ESA. They seem to have very similar science goals, both searching for transiting Earth sized ...
6
votes
1answer
156 views

What are the next planned space telescopes?

We've had hubble for two decades. Its become the most famous space telescope, and lately Kepler seems to be running for the second place. Are there any more powerful, better telescopes planned for ...
11
votes
1answer
275 views

Parking a telescope at a Lagrange point: is this a good idea from a debris point of view?

The James Webb space telescope is supposed to be located at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point. Do we expect the region around that point to have a higher concentration of space debris, asteroids, dust,...