4
votes
4answers
131 views

Burning Out Stars

In the book "A Really Short History Of Nearly Everything", I read that the larger the star is, the faster it burns itself. Whys that? Wouldn't there be more energy to burn if it's larger, and just be ...
3
votes
2answers
66 views

Metallicity of Celestial Objects: Why “Metal = Non-metal”?

Metallicity of objects refers to the amount of chemical elements present in it other than Hydrogen and Helium. Note: The other elements may or may not be actual ...
2
votes
3answers
84 views

Pulsation Modes of Cepheids

There are various modes of Cepheids like single modes: fundamental (F), first overtone (1O), and likewise. And then we have double modes: F/1O, 1O/2O etc. triple modes: 1O/2O/3O etc. ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Putting mass-luminosity relation and HS diagrams together leads us to a mass-age relation; so how do stars lose their mass over time?

I think that the title is completely clear, but here's an expansion: I was just reading about Mass-luminosity relation that says massive stars are more luminous than tiny ones. Well, let's talk about ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Without using absolute magnitudes or isochrones, how might we tell a star's age and evolutionary status?

Usual methods of estimating stellar ages involve isochrone approximations. It can also help to estimate a star's radius by correlating its absolute magnitude with effective temperature and apparent ...