1
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1answer
55 views

Has SETI data been used for astrophysics? How, or why not?

SETI collects alot of data from space, mostly radio. I wonder if this data has any astrophysics value other than SETI?
0
votes
0answers
16 views

How will the Breakthrough Initiatives affect other astronomy observations?

BACKGROUND The Breakthrough Initiatives is in the news because of a $100 million private donation for a SETI project. It doesn't seem to be for building any new observatory (but maybe for buying ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Can a galaxy splits into multiple galaxies?

Is there any naturally occurring event powerful enough that can cause a galaxy regardless of shape and size to divide itself into two or more smaller galaxies?
4
votes
1answer
92 views

Could an ejected “extra ice-giant” still be lurking in distant solar orbit?

BACKGROUND Hot Jupiters are thought to have migrated inwards, implying that another giant planet has been ejected in order to conserve the orbital momentum of those planetary systems. The number of ...
2
votes
1answer
93 views

Can we see Earth by looking into space?

It is known that spacetime is curved,so I am wandering to know if its possible to look into space and we see earth (light from earth long long ago). Did I understood spacetime correctly and if its ...
2
votes
1answer
346 views

Shall we say now that Pluto is “larger than Mercury” ?

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php?page=20150717-3 "Scientists working with NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft have observed Pluto’s atmosphere as far as 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) ...
0
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0answers
38 views

why do peple think the most energetic events in the universe are GRBs?

Recently people have found supermassive black hole binaries with very short orbital period. link They should be more energetic than GRBs when they merge, right? It seems people do not talk about ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Why do we observe spectral lines of specific energy?

The basis of my confusion is that atomic orbitals, even when described accurately by quantum numbers, have definite energies, meaning they represent energy eigenstates of the wave function. They're ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Is the Tombaugh Regio on Pluto visible from Earth?

Is the Tombaugh Regio on Pluto discernably visible from Earth ground based or Earth orbiting telescopes? And more generally, can surface features seen in Hubble images be matched with images from New ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Are lunar occultations visible to the naked eye?

The Moon occults a lot of stars. But are these events visible to the naked eye? Won't it be blinded out by the crescent even at its thinnest just before sunrise? Did ancient astronomers actually ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

What is a “jumping trojan”? And what do their orbits look like?

I was googling Neptune's trojan companions and found on Wiki this claim about ~200 km diameter (316179) 2010 EN65: " the object is actually a jumping trojan, is jumping from the Lagrangian ...
5
votes
2answers
203 views

Does Pluto have impact craters?

I've heard from a lot of sources that Pluto doesn't seem to have any impact craters, but I see a few things that look like impact craters, highlighted in this picture: For comparison, here's ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

How significant is a planet's density to the formation of life?

I'm doing some writing set on a fictional earthlike planet that for reasons needs to be substantially larger than Earth but can't have substantially higher gravity. I've been able to compromise with a ...
2
votes
3answers
165 views

How did our ancestors discover the Solar System?

I wonder, how did our ancestors discover the Solar System? They did not have any telescopes to see distant objects, right? Even a planet looks like a star from a distance. They discovered the ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

What's to be gained from the New Horizons mission once it's beyond the Kuiper Belt?

Now that we have seen what Pluto has to offer and New Horizons is headed to the Kuiper Belt, is there anything we can gain from the mission in interstellar space after it travels beyond the Kuiper ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

How do you determine which star, between two, is more luminous?

For example, if star 1 is 4x bigger than star 2 but both are the exact same temperature how do you determine which is more luminous?
2
votes
1answer
121 views

Real images (not “artist concept”) by NASA

Does NASA make publicly available real images of missions in an organized manner? What I mean is: Say I'm looking for the images taken by New Horizons - a simple list of the images in chronological ...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Any tip on maintaining a log of celestial objects?

I am an amateur observer and Olympus 10x50 binocular is my tool. As I keep locating celestial objects (Planets, Stars etc), I would like to maintain a log of the observed objects. The purpose of the ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

How can they tell no asteriods will hit earth in the next hundreds years?

It has come to my mind this interrogation : How can they tell no asteroids (big enough to create damage) will hit earth in the next hundreds years? Because, so far, we were unable to get a clear ...
2
votes
2answers
43 views

How many nested stable (1 Mio years) orbits are theoretically possible?

If we look at our solar system we have the sun which has planet orbits and planets have moon orbits. If we look at the possible size difference from hypergiants to small asteroids why shouldn't it be ...
4
votes
1answer
68 views

which pulsar has the longest spin period so far?

Vela X-1 has a 283s spin period, while this one may have a 2.7hr spin period. However neither of them is included in ATNF catalog. They are not included in $p-\dot{p}$ diagram either. The longest ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

Speed of light through the ISM and Wavelength

Articles written about fast radio bursts describe the signal's short-wavelength components arriving before its longer-wavelength components, suggesting energy-dependent time delays in the interstellar ...
3
votes
0answers
72 views

Why are retrograde orbits more stable than prograde ones?

Regarding solar system dynamics, i.e. planets in stellar systems and moons in planetary systems, this is often mentioned in the literature, but it is difficult to find a good analysis/explanation of ...
2
votes
2answers
122 views

Can stellar black holes cancel each other?

Hypothetical question: when a pair of identical stellar black holes are very close to one another wouldn't the side facing each other experience lower gravitational force? How is this logic un/sound?
5
votes
2answers
93 views

Official Definition of Satellite?

So I had an argument with a friend, which was about whether the Moon is a planet or a satellite. IAU 2006 Resolution B5 gives definitions on what it is to be a planet, but there is a vagueness, as I ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Problem with Dobsonian reflector telescope

I'm not sure whether I should ask this question here but I'll give it a shot. I have a XT8 Dobsonian Reflector telescope and it works fine. But recently when I use the focuser to focus the image when ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

How to calculate the moon phase

I need a way of to calculate the moon phase. Do you know resources for research the theory from behind this? I basically have searched in Google, but the results were not very satisfactory. Exists a ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Planets and moons positions in cartesian coordinates?

Is there freely available and reliable source, where one can find positions of planets and moons of the Solar system at given time in cartesian coordinates? (I am writing a simple gravity simulator ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Historical astronomical lunar tables

I hope this is the right place to ask this question, and I apologise if not. I've come across a date written in an old book, but it is written using what seems to be a lunar/zodiac system. Below is a ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Energy required for light speed [closed]

It is said that in order for us to travel at the speed of light, there has to be an infinite amount of energy. Light is made up of photons but photons themselves do not have an infinite amount of ...
9
votes
1answer
581 views

Is there a limit to how hot a star can be?

I think that size and mass do not correlate to temperature, but then again these factors contribute to the internal pressure. I would like to know if there is a limit to how hot a star can get and ...
1
vote
1answer
102 views

How to calculate a planet's current position within the solar system

I'm making an application that needs to calculate a planet's current position within the solar system - I don't want to calculate its position in the sky. For example, what I want to do is exactly ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

What does the BinTableHDU store?

I'm just getting started with very primitive analysis of FITS data, and I have a 'raw' FITS file which I don't know how to get different wavebands of data from (if this is even possible). ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

what planet is the most radioactive?

So as I understand it the source of most geothermal energy on Earth is due to radioactive decay. Jupiter is the most massive planet but if the bulk of it's mass comes from gaseous elements instead of ...
4
votes
1answer
123 views

Will the Sun rotate slower in red giant form?

When the Sun runs out of hydrogen to fuse it will grow bigger in size and my question is does it rotate more slowly, like a spinning ice skater extending their arms to reduce angular velocity? What ...
6
votes
3answers
141 views

Why are radio telescopes shaped so differently than optical telescopes?

Why are radio telescopes typically only a dish with a receiver above it, while optical telescopes have a primary, plus secondary and sometimes even a tertiary mirror? In other words, why do radio ...
4
votes
1answer
168 views

How long until the Earth and Moon become a binary planet?

With the rate at which the moon is further receding into a higher orbit, how long until the barycentre between us and the moon leaves the earth, and going by the IAUs 2006 definition update, we become ...
3
votes
0answers
32 views

Are trojans in L5 more likely than in L4?

Mars has much more trojans in L5. Does it reflect a common pattern?
10
votes
1answer
145 views

How has the Earth's orbit changed over hundreds of millions or billion of years?

First, I know that modeling orbital mechanics of 8 planets is hard, but there are some theories out there, for example, Jupiter is thought to have moved in towards the sun then started moving away. ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Who invented the blink comparator?

The Wikipedia page for the blink comparator fails to mention who invented it. Many other pages extol the importance of the device, but we cannot find any mention of an inventor. Wikipedia does ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

How significant and accessible is modern Chinese astronomy?

Is China fully integrated in the international astronomical community, or does military secrecy and language problems and sanctions (ITAR) or something else stand in the way? Does China have valuable ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Suns Orbital speed and escape velocity question

This is a homework question and I don't want an answer but just want to understand what its asking for. We are given that a star with a mass of x solar masses in ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Semimajor axis variations in co-orbital moons

I've been playing with simulations of co-orbital bodies similar to Saturn's moons Janus & Epimetheus- horseshoe orbits where the two bodies are of comparable mass- and I'm seeing some very odd ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Why is $g$ tied to the oscillator strength $f$ in $\log{gf}_{\odot}$

The $\log{gf}$ value of an element in a star, where $f$ is the oscillator strength, or probability of transition in an atom, is a scientifically pursued quantity with relation to the model atmosphere ...
1
vote
3answers
165 views

How small would you have to crush an object for it to become a black hole?

I was wondering how much you had to crush an object for it to become a black hole. Recently I learned that anything could become a black hole (even you) if it were crushed down small enough, for ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

What will the last days of Earth be like?

The sun is a main-sequence star; as I understand it the sun will expand into a red giant in a few billion years. I have heard conflicting reports of what this entails - some sources I found say the ...
6
votes
0answers
91 views

Are stars NML Cygni, UY Scuti, VY Canis Majoris and VV Cephei near the ends of their lives?

Are the three stars mentioned in the title stars that are going to go supernova, or are they stars that are in mid-life, like our Sun, but just happen to be so much larger than our Sun?
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Could martian meteorites come from Olympus Mons?

Could Olympus Mons have thrown ejecta out of Mars' orbit when it was active? Does it fit with the composition and dating of meteorites with martian origin?
2
votes
1answer
43 views

How to tell a crater is old or not?

Based on Wikipedia, we can estimate the age of a planet's surface. How to tell a particular crater is newly formed or not? It may have sharp edge. Different astronomical objects may have different ...
2
votes
2answers
64 views

about H$_\alpha$ and H$_\beta$ lines in astronomical objects' spectra

Generally there may be some line ratio between the two lines. If H$\alpha$ is strong, it is quite possible we can see H$_\beta$ too. Is it possible we can see H$_\beta$, but can not see H$_\alpha$? ...

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