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It depends on the your current date, time of day and your location since, from your point of view, Right Ascension (in hours) is always progressing in the same direction as the stars are moving. Remember that RA "0" is the same as RA "24" and is a line that runs from the north celestial pole to the south celestial pole. If we are trying to find the actual ...


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I'd suggest a good star atlas and look for stars that are close to that meridian. Depending on how accurate you want to be you can use a telescope to get closer (ie to observe stars that are not visible to the naked eye). But what is it that you are trying to do? Set setting circles on a telescope? You don't need to look for RA=0h0'00" then - simply look ...


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There are two faintly visible areas of nebulosity on the above image taken from the Palomar Sky Survey, that correlate with the remnants of Supernova 1572. Sidney van den Bergh imaged this object in 1970 with the Palomar 200 inch telescope, comparing this with similar images taken by Walter Baade in 1949, 1955 and 1957. His findings were published in the ...


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You're probably asking the wrong question - which I am going to answer anyway, and after that I am going to answer the question you should have asked instead. As a general rule, there isn't much point in pushing the magnification above 2x the diameter of the instrument, measured in mm. 3 inch, that's 75mm, that's 150x max. Beyond that limit, even under ...


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In typical seeing condition you should be able to use a magnification (see here) of about 25-30x per inch of apperture, so for your telescope that is about 100x, in exceptional condition you could push that up to maybe double that. Also the more magnification you use the less contrast you will have in the image, so really you want the lowest magnification ...



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