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Yes, we certainly can see the Milky Way from Earth. I saw it through an airplane window at night. But you don't need to do that, either. Find some place with not much pollution, especially light and smoke, and gaze up at night. You should see a beautiful band of stars. Proof? In the 1990's, there was a major electricity blackout in Los Angeles. People looked ...


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There are a few nearby galaxies that can be seen with the naked eye, but clear & dark skies are essential. Most notable for northern-hemisphere viewers is the Andromeda Galaxy also known as M31, best viewed in late summer and fall; from the southern hemisphere the Magellanic Clouds, irregular satellites of our own Galaxy, are famous landmarks. These all ...


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Most photographs you will see of the Milky Way are long exposure photographs (often around 30 seconds exposure, whatever the limit is before star trails become noticeable at their focal distance; sometimes longer if they use a tracking mount) at a very wide aperture. This is done to capture the maximum amount of light and, in fact, capture far more light ...


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In order to see the Milky Way, or the white streak across the night sky, you need to go to a VERY dark place where there is no light pollution whatsoever, and of course the sky has to be clear. So you should go to places like the desert, the woods, the mountains, and some observatories. When you look up, you will see the white streak which is apart of the ...


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To see the milky way, you need merely go out at night somewhere where there is a dark, clear sky. In northern hemisphere fall and winter, you'll also be able to see the nearest large galaxy, M31. The large and small Magellanic clouds, visibly grace southern skies. If you live in a city, a cloudy, hazy or very humid region, you're out of luck, unless you can ...


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The resolved stars (those that can be seen as individuals) are all part of the Milky Way Galaxy (unless there are any interlopers that have been captured!). The distances to the next nearest galaxies of any size are more than 100,000 light years. Andromeda is 2 million light years away. Unless one goes supernova, there basically aren't any types of star ...



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