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It's a pretty broad topic. It depends a bit on the type of DSO. Speaking in general, most DSOs lack brightness, and so to observe them you need two things: lack of light pollution lots of aperture Light pollution Observing from the city, DSOs are challenging. The further away you are from city lights, the better your views. Deserts, national parks, ...


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Some can, some can't. Viewing really is determined by ability, experience and technique when you leave viewing conditions aside. A lot of DSOs have a lower surface brightness, one thing I always notice is when an observer continuously increases their magnification to see the object larger. Surface brightness is proportional to magnification, the higher the ...


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Much like Jeremy has answered, Mars will appear just larger than a point, you will be able to discern a disk, however with minimal detail. For an overview of the disk you will see, I two versions of a virtual telescope in Wolfram Mathemtica; one with an orange disk and another using models of the planets. Anyway, using the orange disk variant, I input the ...


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A brief overview of RA is the angular distance measured eastward from the vernal equinox along the celestial equator. Another way to say that refers to where the celestial equator intersects the horizon at a right angle. If you are able to follow the celestial equator to the point known as the vernal equinox, 0Deg RA is at the intersection point, with RA ...


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Try the moon first. If you see nothing but black, assuming that you don't have a lens cap on or something, then most likely, you are zoomed in on, well, relative blackness. The star you were viewing is probably off to the side now. Or, you may just be looking through the eye-piece at the wrong angle or something. The moon is too big a target to miss, and ...



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