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The invariant mass of a multi-particle system (in a galaxy the 'particles' being stars, etc.) can come (in part, or even in whole for systems of massless particles) from the kinetic energy of its constituent particles. The relativistic picture of gravity (i.e. general relativity) is a bit more complicated, but it is clear that in a multi-particle system (in ...


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The first part, "could the galactic cluster orbit another at 10000000km/h". Is no. For simple observational reasons. If the local group were in orbit, we would be able to see and measure the supercluster which we were orbiting. We don't see it so it isn't there. I take it that you hypothesise that the 28% of the mass of the universe that is not visible, is ...


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The Higgs Boson can't be a dark matter particle. The Higgs Boson decays into other particles about $10^{-22}$ seconds after it forms. (So fast that the LHC doesn't directly detect the Higgs, it detects the spray of particles decaying from the Higgs). So while the Higgs field is everywhere, there aren't a lot of Higgs bosons in the universe. Dark matter ...


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To answer this question, we need to understand what dark matter and a Higgs Boson are. Higgs Boson A Higgs Boson is an elementary particle in the standard field of quantum physics. It was theorised by a few people, namely Peter Higgs. The Higgs Field is a field which we can now believe exists, as we can detect it through its excitations, which become Higgs ...



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