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You seem to have two types of seasons confused. Astronomical seasons are relatively stable in their durations, while seasons as defined by the weather, can vary by several weeks. For example, snow 3 weeks after spring begins or freezing weather before winter begins. This is what is meant when we say an early summer or a late winter. It simply means that ...


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While the other answer here and the link provided by Jeremy give excellent explanations, I believe a bit more nuanced reasoning is required. Although the theory of planet formation is currently still incomplete, it is generally accepted that planets form in a so-called proto-planetary disk as a part of stellar formation process. This is backed up by several ...


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It starts with the formation of the solar system. The solar system started off in a large cloud of gas, under gravity, this cloud started to collapse. Most of the mass was concentrated at the centre which eventually formed into the sun. Due to the conservation of angular momentum, as the cloud collapse it started to spin and form into a disk with a bulge ...


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You have 2 separate concepts here. The length of a day and a year are unconnected with how you measure seconds, minutes and hours. The length of a day is defined as how long it takes for the planet to rotate on its axis, and a year is how long it takes to orbit its primary. Seconds, minutes and hours are a measurement chosen by us back in history, and ...


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To answer your second question: Upsilon Andromedae c and d have mutual inclination of 30 degrees http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upsilon_Andromedae Note that you cannot calculate mutual inclination by subtracting one inclination from another from exoplanet data catalogs because the "inclination" used in exoplanet studies is a 2D line-of-sight-to Earth ...


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Let's start answering your question in reverse. Ceres could not be "the missing Theia" (I know you don't say that; I'm addressing a side issue) because of its shape. If an object hit the Earth at an angle (as is currently thought), it would be pretty deformed, if it managed to stay together. If it hit the Earth head on . . . Well, it would almost certainly ...


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Of course the apparent relative sizes of the sun and moon are coincidental. What other rational explanation is there? Maybe NASA built the moon that way on purpose. LOL oops ... "For reference, the Moon is currently at a distance of approximately 37.5 Earth radii." I wonder where that odd figure came from. This "37.5" radii figure is very inaccurate. ...


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Ok, it makes a lot of sense that the gravity of the disc of the Milky Way is pulling stars up and down as they go about their circum-galactic orbit. But this wouldn't explain why recent 3-D observations of the nearest stars using the FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectrograph on ESO’s Very Large Telescope and the IMACS spectrograph at the Las Campanas Observatory showed a ...



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