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You seem to have two types of seasons confused. Astronomical seasons are relatively stable in their durations, while seasons as defined by the weather, can vary by several weeks. For example, snow 3 weeks after spring begins or freezing weather before winter begins. This is what is meant when we say an early summer or a late winter. It simply means that ...


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You have 2 separate concepts here. The length of a day and a year are unconnected with how you measure seconds, minutes and hours. The length of a day is defined as how long it takes for the planet to rotate on its axis, and a year is how long it takes to orbit its primary. Seconds, minutes and hours are a measurement chosen by us back in history, and ...


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+taupunkt basically answered this: the thin lunar crescent after New Moon is only visible for a short while after sunset. While the sun is up, the moon is invisible and it becomes visible when, after sunset, the sky turns dark enough. However, the moon will set typically 1-2 hours after sunset, and will become invisible some time before that due to ...


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You can imagine that if you hopped into a rocket and blasted off in a lateral direction, you would be able to view the moon from a different perspective and see more and more of the side illuminated by the sun. But the earth is only about 12,700 km across whereas the earth-moon distance averages about 385,000 km. That means that the angle you are viewing ...


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Let's start answering your question in reverse. Ceres could not be "the missing Theia" (I know you don't say that; I'm addressing a side issue) because of its shape. If an object hit the Earth at an angle (as is currently thought), it would be pretty deformed, if it managed to stay together. If it hit the Earth head on . . . Well, it would almost certainly ...


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Of course the apparent relative sizes of the sun and moon are coincidental. What other rational explanation is there? Maybe NASA built the moon that way on purpose. LOL oops ... "For reference, the Moon is currently at a distance of approximately 37.5 Earth radii." I wonder where that odd figure came from. This "37.5" radii figure is very inaccurate. ...



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