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You need at least two images from same objects in diferent angle or position for generate a depth to calculate position, or same image position in diferent dates and a possible object aditional in image , in other way , any calculatiion is wrong


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Circumstances that would make it impossible to predict a large metorite strike? That's the wrong question. The right question is how much lead time is needed. A perfect prediction of an impact does no good if the prediction is too late. Several months of lead time is too late for a long-period comet. Several years of lead time may be too late if the ...


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The answer is "it depends." It depends on what kinds of eclipses you count, and perhaps even more importantly, how likely you are to see the event. There are four types of solar eclipses: Total solar eclipses, in which the Moon blocks the entirety of the Sun at some point on the surface of the Earth. About 26.7% of the solar eclipses are total eclipses. ...


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The reason that solar and lunar eclipses are about equally common, is that they occur when the moon is "close enough" to the plane of the ecliptic at the point where it is full (lunar eclipse) or new (solar eclipse). Otherwise it completely misses the sun (solar eclipse) or the earth's shadow (lunar eclipse), and you don't get even a partial eclipse. If the ...


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Solar and lunar eclipses occur about equally often - between two and four times per year. However, when you do not intentionally travel around the world chasing solar eclipses, you are more likely to observe more lunar eclipses. The reason is that solar eclipses can only be observed from a comparatively small area while lunar eclipses can be observed from ...


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They are not that rare; there are 4 to 6 solar and lunar eclipses each year with an equal number of each (on average).


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Data from observatory archives is a good way to go. Here is another one with tons of imaging datasets: http://archive.eso.org


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First, let assume your image geometry is homogeneous, and has no peculiar distorsion in either direction. Second, let assume you have the resolution of your image: the number of arcseconds / pixel. Now, take one 'red-cross' star, call it A. It will be the origin of the triangle we will draw. Name your 'yellow-cross' star B. Now, take a new point, called ...



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