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In my opinion yes, mass affects volume. Instead of a cube, imagine a pyramid with a 3 sided base. All edges have the same length defined by the time to reflect light back and forth between the apexs. The number of smaller such pyramids that could be fit inside would increase with mass because the path of light would be bent. Bent light means bent space, ...


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If you can provide examples of numerical methods in GR you've seen/heard of that would help focus the question. From the article you linked to: "The technique keeps track of a vast number of quarks and gluons by describing the space and time inside a proton with a set of points that make up a 4D lattice". This almost gets to the main issue with Numerical ...


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The way that you have specified the question, the answer is as far as you like. You simply put your spaceship into any orbit around the black hole and wait. A more sensible question is what is the largest time dilation factor that can be accomplished - i.e. that maximises your travel time into the future for a given amount of proper time experienced on the ...


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As far as we know, once beyond the event horizon, someone might experience all of time in the blink of an eye until the hawking radiation makes the black hole disappear and the person comes out again. More likely though you'd just get spaghettified.. In all seriousness though, there is no real limitation, although they aren't really transported to the ...


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The latter is closest to the truth, although I wouldn't use the phrasing "stretch". The "mouths" of the wormhole are (more or less) fixed in comoving coordinates (i.e. the coordinate system that expands with the Universe, and in which galaxies lie approximately still). But the bridge is sort of outside our three-dimensional space, and doesn't necessarily ...



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