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As HDE 226868 noted in his answer, the Sun is not going to go supernova. That's something only large stars experience at the end of their main sequence life. Our Sun is a dwarf star. It's not big enough to do that. It will instead expand to be a red giant when it burns out the hydrogen at the very core of the Sun. It will continue burning hydrogen as a red ...


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The Sun does not have nearly enough mass to become a supernova. Instead, it will swell to become a red giant, enveloping Mercury, Venus, and possibly Earth. After that, it will shed its outer layers as a planetary nebula, and settle down to become a white dwarf. Wikipedia, apparently, says the exact same things I had though of: The Sun does not have ...


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What id like to know, in what distance do they have to be from each other to create only one gravitational influence. At whichever point you decide to call them two objects rather than one object. It's a completely arbitrary choice that depends on you rather than gravitational physics. What's going on is that gravity can be described by a mass density ...


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Gravity plus dark energy reportedly can combine to do awful things to the amount of energy in the universe: If dark energy does exist, then it ultimately causes the expansion of the Universe to accelerate. On their journey from the CMB to the telescopes like WMAP, photons (the basic particles of electromagnetic radiation including light and radio waves) ...


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Gravity travels at light speed (or less, possibly), so even in an infinite non-expanding universe of finite age you'd only be gravitationally interacting with a finite mass in a finite volume. Our universe is observed to be expanding, further inhibiting us from coming into contact with new objects. Furthermore, a common assumption of cosmological models is ...


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Gravitational collapse occurs when an object's internal pressure is insufficient to resist the object's own gravity. In the cases of stars, it normally usually happens because of one of these 2 reasons: The star has too little "fuel" left to maintain its temperature The star that would have been stable receives extra matter in a way that does not raise ...


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Let the two bodies involved have masses $m_1, m_2$. Start with Newton's second law $$F = ma$$ where $a$ is acceleration. The gravitational force on body 2 from body 1 is given by $$F_{21} = \frac{G m_1 m_2}{|r_{21}|^3}r_{21}$$ where $r_{21}$ is the relative position vector for the two bodies in question. The force on body 1 from body two is of course ...


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There are several major types of black hole, and each forms differently: Quantum black holes - these aren't currently proven to exist, but many scientists think they are likely. These are microscopic black holes, which are believed to have formed in the Big Bang, though they can be created wherever there is enough energy. Stellar-mass black holes. These ...


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The what if is superficial, it could never exist, but if one were to imagine, then; the out come would be very bleak for Earth and Mankind alike. Jupiter has the strongest gravitational pull in our solar system and most likely in our galaxy. It is one of our solar system's gas planets,or Jovian planets; it's core is made of H3, the gas succumbs to the ...



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