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How can a planet capture a moon? There are 178 moons in the Solar System, according to the NASA Planetary Fact Sheet, so it seems to be a common event. The following sections will show that moon capture is actually unlikely, but when a planet has one or more moons capture becomes easier. Initial Conditions Starting from the initial conditions, the planet ...


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Jupiter is a very bright object, so maybe the best procedure is to use your filters, they might help with the glare. However, I think you have either a case of low resolution or distortion. Generally, the larger the diameter of the telescope, the better is the resolution (more details here). Resolution defines how much detail you are able to resolve with the ...


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There are at least two interpretations to this problem: Per Wikipedia, Jupiter's surface gravity is $2.528$ times Earth's. Thus, if the Earth were $2.528$ times denser, it would have the same surface gravity as Jupiter. The Earth's current density is $5.514$ grams per cubic centimeter, so the new density would be $2.528 \times 5.514$, or about $13.9394$ ...


5

You only need two formulae. Gravitational field of a spherically symmetric mass distribution is given by $$g = \frac{GM}{R^2},$$ where $M$ is the mass inside a radius $R$. The second formula is the average density of a sphere is its mass divided by its volume, hence $$\rho = \frac{M}{(4/3)\pi R^3}$$ These two formulae can obviously be put together to give ...


1

Often it helps to use colored filters that screw into the base of your eyepieces. They can increase the contrast of the details you are looking for. They are not very expensive and work quite well for this. You can also find used ones on many of the amateur astronomy sites that have a "classified" section. Different colors work better depending on the colors ...


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Every scope has a minimum and maximum useful magnification (minimum on your scope is 18X and maximum is 152X - from specs on Telescope.com). Anything outside of those numbers will compromise your ability to see well through the scope. To figure out how best to make use of your scope within the restrictions of useful magnification, you need to start with how ...


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There are two effects that alter the simple hyperbolic (or elliptic) relative orbit of any minor body ("moon") and a planet. First, the gravity of the Sun (and to a much lesser degree of Jupiter). To good approximation the planet-Sun system is a circular binary and the moon a test particle (its mass negligible). The orbits of test particles in such a system ...


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The simple answer is that the composition in terms of elements doesn't matter for the colour, since that is determined by the molecular composition as well as state (pressure and temperature) of the visual layers (which contain a small but significant fraction of other elements than H and He). Given the differences in the giant planets temperature and ...


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Jupiter has a solid core. It is very small compared to its total size. The solid core is responsible for the very strong magnetic field that surrounds Jupiter.


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You could just have Googled this question. Post #5 from the first hit: First off, by "wondering what colors different gas giants can be", you are presumably asking about their light spectra through the visible range of wavelengths (380-720 nm), right?** Light interacts primarily with electrons. It is scattered or absorbed in the presence of ...


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Jupiter does not have a "surface" and nor is there anything but an arbitrary division between interplanetary space and where its atmosphere begins. The crushing pressure, is its atmospheric pressure. The deeper into the atmosphere you go, the greater the column of gas that lies above you. It is tthe weight of this column of gas that is responsible for the ...



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