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Try WinJupos. It can be used to measure Jupiter (as well as other planets)


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why didn't the sun's gravity keep the inner planets from forming? The short answer is, the asteroid belt orbits the sun, it doesn't orbit Jupiter, and you shouldn't expect the same effect with 2 different relations. The sun is the gravitational object that the Asteroid belt orbits. Jupiter is not and it has a stabilizing effect on the material that ...


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@Knu8 was right that adding mass to a gas giant will turn it into a star long before the gas giant could become a white dwarf or neutron star. But that works if you add fusionable material such as hydrogen. If you add something that can't fuse into a heavier element, such as Iron or Tin, the matter just keeps accreting onto the gas giant until the planet ...


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Gas giants like Jupiter consists mainly of Hydrogen and some Helium. If you gradually add mass to these planets then core temperatures will rise gradually and a stage will come where they will ignite like normal stars. Unlike white dwarfs where accretion of mass leads to type 1A supernova.


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During the early days of the solar system there was a high abundance of matter in the early solar system. Easily enough to form the planets and a lot of matter to spare. Also during the initial stages of formation of the solar system matter was distributed very densely when compared to what the density is today. At that point there were lots of asteroids and ...



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