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It is. Tidal disruption occurs when $\rho_{Jup}(R_{Jup}/R)^3$ > $\rho_{comet}$ where R is the separation and $\rho$ is the density. The density of Jupiter is 1.33 g/$cm^3$ and the comet was estimated to have a density of only 0.5 g/$cm^3$ based on the radius at which it disrupted. That is, disruption took place at separation R ~ $(1.33/0.5)^{1/3} ...


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Jupiter's features change constantly, thanks to new leaps in the field of Astronomy, i.e Hubble, Spitzer and soon to come in 2018 the James Web telescope, we have been able to see our Universe in ways never imagined. July 1994, when more than 20 pieces of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) plunged into Jupiter's atmosphere it caused a flash of energy bright ...


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Jupiter is highly dynamic: Jupiter Animated Video Gallery (be sure to look at storm merger video) Differences Spotted in Jupiter's Big Red Storms Jupiter's New Red Spot Jupiter Loses Big Belt; Great Spot Left Hanging The persistence of Jupiter's Red spot is in fact a bit of a mystery.


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http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/review/dr-marc-solar-system/gas-giants.html We think of a gas as something very . . . well, airy. After all, air is the gas we all know and love. We breathe it and fly planes right through it with no trouble. So it makes sense to think that a gas planet must be like a big, airy cloud floating out in space. Saturn in true color. ...


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we see that its features didn't change largely over many years Jupiter is huge. It is 11 earths across, and 1300 times our volume. The clouds/bands we can see are vastly larger than Earth's entire ecosystem and that means they have a lot more inertia. Also consider our observation timespan. We have been watching Jupiter* for under 2 centuries, ...


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Believe it or not, Jupiter isn't too consistent. Take a look at these pictures, the first taken in 2009 and the second taken in 2010: and Quite the difference, eh? Why? Jupiter's atmosphere is made of zones and belts. Zones are colder and are composed of rising gases; they are dark-colored. Belts are warmer and are composed of falling gases; they ...


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The what if is superficial, it could never exist, but if one were to imagine, then; the out come would be very bleak for Earth and Mankind alike. Jupiter has the strongest gravitational pull in our solar system and most likely in our galaxy. It is one of our solar system's gas planets,or Jovian planets; it's core is made of H3, the gas succumbs to the ...


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Ceres constitutes about 1/3 of the mass of the asteroid belt. Assuming the same density, the whole asteroid belt combined into one planet would have 3 times greater volume than Ceres and $\sqrt[3]{3}=1.44...$ times greater radius.


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The largest main belt asteroid is 1 Ceres, which alone contains almost a third of the total mass of the whole main asteroid belt. Ceres is large enough to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, i.e. its own gravity is strong enough to pull it into a roughly spherical shape. Since the mass of a spherical planet scales as the cube of the diameter (assuming constant ...


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The mass of the asteroid main belt is estimated at 4% the mass of our moon according to Wikipedia so any object formed from the aggregation of that mass would not be a planet. It would be the size of a very small moon. Even if all the asteroids in the solar system were combined, the total mass would be below a third of the moon's mass.



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