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From the Nature article, the authors propose two alternative explanations: We used photometric measurements to explore two possible scenarios and investigate their nature. For particles reflecting solar radiation, clouds of CO2-ice or H2O-ice particles with an effective radius of 0.1 micrometres are favoured over dust. Alternatively, the plume ...


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Since the rate of lengthening of the day on Mars is three orders of magnitude less than that of the Earth for a first go at calculating how long it will be before the day lengths are equal we can ignore the change in day length on Mars. The difference in day lengths is $\approx 40$ minutes. The Earths day lengthens by $\approx 1.7$ ms/100 years. Therefore ...


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How would you get a magnetar close to Mars, within the solar system? OK, let's leave that to one side, but the Earth's magnetic field is of order $10^{-4}$ Tesla at strongest. As the dipole field of a magnetar diminishes as $r^{-3}$ and could be as high as $10^{11}$ Teslas at the surface of the magnetar, at a radius of 10 km, then the magnetar woud need to ...


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None of these things were named after chocolate. Milky Way The name comes from a Greek myth, at the end of which Hera - Zeus' wife - spills her breast milk. In places where the sky has not been affected by light pollution, the Milky Way looks like a milky-white streak. Hence the name. The chocolate of the same name was introduced in 1923. Apparently, it ...


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Often it helps to use colored filters that screw into the base of your eyepieces. They can increase the contrast of the details you are looking for. They are not very expensive and work quite well for this. You can also find used ones on many of the amateur astronomy sites that have a "classified" section. Different colors work better depending on the colors ...


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Every scope has a minimum and maximum useful magnification (minimum on your scope is 18X and maximum is 152X - from specs on Telescope.com). Anything outside of those numbers will compromise your ability to see well through the scope. To figure out how best to make use of your scope within the restrictions of useful magnification, you need to start with how ...


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Parachutes have never been used on the moon, but they are viable for Mars because Mars does have an atmosphere - albiet one much lighter than that of Earth. For that reason, parachutes cannot be the only means of slowing down on Mars --- for example, in the case of the Curiosity Rover, that's why an elaborate booster and crane combination was used (see ...



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