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3

If we look at Mars' possible geothermal gradient (see Earth's) which is about 25 °C per km. Using the low estimate of Mars's gradient to be 1/4 that of Earth's Source, that's a bit over 6° C per km. so 55 km, 330° C. Added that to Mars' average surface temperature of -55 C, you're talking 275° C or 527° F at 55 km underground, and that's a low estimate. ...


0

Nobody knows it. 55 km depth is probably between crust and mantle, with estimated temperatures well above 500 K.


4

Nasa has a atmospheric model of mars: $$0.699 *e^{-0.00009 h} $$ A naive application of this model, solving for a pressure of 101 kPa, gives a depth of -55 km. The Armstrong limit depth (at which water boils at body temperature) is -24km The model assumes constant temperature, and gravity (it doesn't correct for the fact that at 55 km below the surface ...


2

Try this link http://geo.pds.nasa.gov/missions/mgs/megdr.html This should have the data you're looking for, though you may need to process it a bit to get it into a format hat will be usable.



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