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An astronaut on the moon could only be seen by reflecting the Sun's light towards Earth. Stars on the other hand emit their own light. To first order, the amount of flux incident upon the Moon from the Sun is the same as that at the Earth - about 1.4 kW/m$^{2}$. Let us assume that an astronaut is perfectly reflective and that the relevant reflective area ...


2

Here's my take on it. I'm not sure what the mystery is - there appear to be two contributing factors. Both the Moon and the Earth simply reflect/partially absorb the light that is incident upon them from the Sun. The overall of albedo is of little consequence, since the reflection of any light will result in an object that appears bright against the night ...


1

The photo in your question is -- well, not exactly fake, but a composite. The biggest clue is that Earth is too close to the horizon; it would have had to be taken from within a few degrees of the boundary between the near and far sides of the Moon, and none of the Apollo missions landed there. Furthermore, take a close look at the cloud patterns. The view ...



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