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6

I'm not sure I agree with the double planet POV, but the calculation is pretty simple. The earth weighs 81 moons, so for the Barycenter to be outside the earth, the distance (center of Moon to surface of earth), = 81 earth radii. or about 515,000 KM. It's current farthest distance is 405,000 KM, average distance 384,000 KM and closest 363,000 KM ...


4

In fact there is no official definition of a satellite. Issac Asimov makes a good argument that the Moon is a planet since its orbit is convex around the Sun for its entire orbit, unlike the other moons of the solar system which are concave when in opposition and convex (to the Sun) when in conjunction. Additionally, the idea that a body is a satellite of ...


3

Even if we assume a dark-adjusted human eye could in principle discern artificial lights on the night side of the Earth, there's the problem that your eyes won't be dark-adjusted because the day side will be much, much brighter than the night side. There's not enough dynamic range in the eye to sense that sort of a brightness difference at once. And if ...


3

tl;dr: Perfectly full moon lasts, never more than, approximately 2 minutes. Estimating an answer from the point of view of Plain Geometry: If we approximate, that the sun is at an infinite distance, then exactly half of the moon is illuminated. Next, how much of the Moon do I see when I look at it from Earth? (This has nothing to do with illumination of ...


3

A Supermoon is when the point in the Moons orbit when it is at its closest to the Earth coincides with full or new Moon (see Wikipedia entry). A blue Moon is (in this instance) the occurrence of a second full Moon in the same calendar month (see Wikipedia entry), and is unrelated to the coincident Supermoon. Also the apparent size difference between a full ...


3

The moon only seems light in color against the backdrop of the void. It's actually fairly dark. Moon's albedo (scientific term for how reflective something is) is .12 and Earth's .3. So earth is two and a half times more reflective. Moreover the moon subtends about half a degree as seen from earth while the earth subtends nearly two degrees as seen from the ...


3

From the perspective of the Moon, the Earth exhibits phases just as does the Moon when viewed from the perspective of the Earth. There are however some differences. One difference is that the phase of the Earth at a fixed local lunar time will be pretty much the same from one day to the next. This is a result of the fact that the Moon is tidally locked. ...


2

Yes, there are Earth phases, viewing from the Moon. Full earths, half earths, quarter earths, waning and waxing earths. The easiest way to visualize this is, imagine the earth is still, one half of the Earth facing the sun, the other half away from the sun, so you have half the Earth is light, half is dark, now, imagine you're on the moon orbiting the ...


1

Your final three questions: Should the supplementary Q&A sheet considered as legimate official definitions, or should it be considered as a one way of interpreting the Resolution B5? That supplementary Q&A absolutely should not be considered as legitimate official definitions. That Q&A pertains to the original draft of the resolution. The ...


1

You can calculate this using the program "KAIROS", See here: http://www.raymondm.co.uk/ It will let you play through the variables: Is this a Julian or a Gregorian date? Is it using true or mean positions? And so forth.


1

In this video there is blue diffused sunlight present in the atmosphere. At any point where you might expect blue light to be diffused from the Moon, there is also blue light diffused from the Sun being added back into what you see. To know for sure, you would need to have a recording from night. The density of air could also be a consideration. The ...



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