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Depends on the interpretation of your question... The best places not to observe the moon are the north and south pole. On the north pole you will only be able to see objects above the celestial equator. As the moon orbits the Earth in one month its orbit is inclined from the celestial equator. This inclination is almost the same as the inclination of the ...


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Orbital radius depends on speed of the body. Size is largely irrelevant. Imagine a space craft and much larger space station, able to orbit meters apart at the same speed, with engines switched off. An astronaut going on a spacewalk would be launched away from the station, being much smaller and so on wrong orbit. No. It's as relevant as "Boeing 747 ...


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To add to Florin's great answer, even the dark part of the moon is visible due to illumination by the earth (has a magnitude of around -3, probably calculated for a new moon/solar eclipse configuration - http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1943MNSSA...2...24J, first paragraph of 'brightness of earthshine on moon'). So, the moon is always visible if not in the ...


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I remember that well. I presume you're referring to an episode of "The Outer Limits," which was based on a short story by Larry Niven. Having looked into the idea back when I read the story in the 1990s, I can say it's plausible in the sense that it's not strictly prohibited by any law of physics. That said, a solar flare would have to be of precisely the ...


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Here's a NASA movie showing Libration: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=4000 As given in the details here, the position angle is the angle between the Moon's north and celestial north. This changes because of the inclination of ecliptic to equator + inclination of moon's orbit to ecliptic and plus, there might be some contribution from the ...


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The "small vibration" is Libration, and it does not imply that lunar axis changes orientation. It is caused by Moon's movement not being a perfectly circular orbit parallel to Earth's Equator with aligned axis. Here's a description of the causes of libration from the Royal Observatory (check the linked page for graphics of each source): Synchronous ...



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