Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

You must have misheard it, or the documentary you watched wasn't presenting very precise information. It does set but it also stays on the night sky for several days during the polar winter (polar night) when the Moon if full. This is relatively simple to imagine, so I'll describe it; So what's happening is that the Earth's axial tilt during the polar ...


6

To expand on what taupunkt commented, on average, according to the article Solar Eclipse: What is a Total Solar Eclipse & When is the Next One? (Rao, 2014), it is a unique quirk of nature that The sun's 864,000-mile diameter is fully 400 times greater than that of our puny moon, which measures just 2,160 miles. But the moon also happens to be about ...


5

What can a lunar-based telescope do? First, you would have no atmospheric distortions to interfere with the viewing. Second, there would be no atmospheric absorption of ultraviolet or infrared light. Third, there would be no cloud cover, so viewing can be almost continuous (the sun may interfere). However, the star should be bright and its ...


4

Because light with higher frequency, that is bluer colors, scatters more in Earth's atmosphere and celestial objects thus look redder (yellow is towards red) while the atmosphere looks blue. See Rayleigh scattering. Here is video with a lengthy and somewhat entertaining explanation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRh75B5iotI


3

Good previous answer, just to add. The Moon can also look shades of yellow and red when there is a high amount of pollution in the air. I live in Australia and the moon can look Yellow, orange and red when the bush fire season is about us and there is a lot of smoke in the air. I have also noticed in cities like New York on windless days that the moon can ...


2

For the practical side of TidalWave's excellent answer, here's a moon almanac for the place: http://www.timeanddate.com/moon/norway/longyearbyen In 2014 the moon is above the horizon for a maximum of about 9 days at a time.


2

From http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2000/ast26oct_1/: "When a Leonid meteoroid hits the Moon it vaporizes some dust and rock," explains Jody Wilson of the Boston University Imaging Science Team. "Some of those vapors will contain sodium (a constituent of Moon rocks) which does a good job scattering sunlight. If any of the ...


1

The main point is that it all depends on the optics quality. Nikon is a good brand, but $300 for a 50mm binocular is way too much. Remember the golden rule while buying any kind of telescope or binocular: Aperture matters, not the Magnification. In a binocular, say "7x50" models, you get 7x magnification with 50mm aperture, which restricts how far you can ...


1

Extending @Aaron: Which also does matter, that it is relatively common in the universe ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abundance_of_the_chemical_elements ). For example, rubidium has a much lower ionization energy, but it can only be found in traces, while sodium is one of the most frequent elements in the stony planets.


1

Early in the solar system's history, the Sun was surrounded by a protoplanetary disk, full of gas, dust and rock. Eventually, protoplanets began to form. These were small, rocky bodies - smaller than the rocky planets today, but bigger than asteroids. Think of them as dwarf-planet-sized objects. All the terrestrial planets formed from them. Anyway, as you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible