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1

Saturn and Jupiter have many moons for quite a few reasons, one of the main ones being that they have an absolutely immense gravitational pull. During the early stages of the formation of our solar system, there would of been many planet-like objects floating around which our gas giants would have attracted. Furthermore, these planets are so far out in the ...


3

Well, I wasn't sure if tidal forces between Earch and Sun were strong enough to have any effect on the matter. Truth to be told, the article barrycarter linked clarifies that tidal forces have neglible meaning in comparison to the effect of Sun's nuclear fusion mass loss. That's correct. Some more details on this. Tidal "tugging" is a two ...


-4

The theorized reason I saw on the either the NASA or Discovery Channel for the Moon's orbit spiraling away from earth is that it's formation resulted from a collision between the Earth and an asteroid, and resulting momentum carries it away.


6

Yes - the earth and sun do have tidal forces like the moon and earth. There are two main reasons this is happening. The sun is always losing mass due to nuclear reactions, the sun is always converting a tiny amount of its mass into energy. This means the pull on the earth is weakened. The tidal forces that happen between us on the moon happen between the ...


0

I vaguely remember my dad talking about this. Uranium and other heavy elements are dense. When the celestial body was molten (early in it's life) all the heavy elements sank to the core of the body. Now, with tectonics, the heavy elements are brought back up to the surface. This is why we can mine Uranium on Earth near the surface: the Uranium was brought ...


7

I'll assume you mean the lit side of the Moon (this wasn't clear from the original question, but I've edited it). Suppose there's a crescent Moon visible in the sky during the day. Plot a straight line between the tips of the crescent, then plot a perpendicular straight line across its center across the sky. Intuitively, that line should pass through the ...


2

As addition: What Conrad said about ring systems is true, we have a possible first detection, but nowhere near detections to make any claim about such phenomena being normal. Also our knowledge on that won't change much in the coming years. With the upcoming photometric missions on transits like NASA's TESS or ESA's PLATO we'll probably be only able to ...


2

First, Azimov was writing (Edge 1982, and Earth 1986) before the first extra solar planets were tentatively detected (1989), or definitely detected 1991 or 1992. So what he wrote could not be based on any real data on extra solar planets, and must have been an educated guess. However both books were written after the discovery of Charon, so he may have been ...



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