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I'm going to try to take a stab at answering this. With our current technologies, detecting exomoons can prove hard however there are various techniques being used today such as: Analyzing data from the Kepler Spacecraft Dynamic effects – the exomoon tugs the planet, which causes deviations in the times and durations of the host planet’s transits. This is ...


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The Summer Solstice in 2016 will occur at 22:34 UT on the 20th June, and the full moon will occur at 11:02 UT on that day (but since they are 12 hours apart that won't be on the same day everywhere). Solstice data from here (GMT- Grenwich Mean Time =UT) New and full moon data from here (UTC- Coordinated Universal Time =GMT=UT)


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The chances of what you are suggesting are almost nil. Though we might be constantly scanning our surrounding atmosphere to detect fragments of, or actual meteorites, other than the debris and artificial satellites that we ourselves have put in orbit around the earth, there is no second moon currently in orbit around us to the best of our knowledge. There ...


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Out of curiosity I looked into this a bit. North/South on the moon is pretty irrelevant for the objects orbit, but it struck at East 339 degrees (or West 21 degrees) near the Lubiniezky craters in the northwest part of Mare Nubium - which can be seen here - towards the center but a little bit in the south eastern part of the map. and you can see the ...


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[NOTE: The animated GIFs are too large to copy into this post, but the URLs should work] http://test.bcinfo3.barrycarter.info/farmoon.gif The image above would apply if: the Earth and Moon both had circular orbits (approximately true) the Moon's siderial period was exactly 1/12th year (approximately true) the Earth's distance from the Sun was 150 ...


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Not an answer, but I thought this was a good slice of a picture of the Moon's orbit around the sun. Source: http://www.wired.com/2012/12/does-the-moon-orbit-the-sun-or-the-earth/


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What is the reason for this difference between assumed and actual path variation? Even your second image isn't correct. Imagine zooming in on a small portion of the Moon's orbit about the Sun, for example, one full moon to the next, with the Sun zoomed out of the picture. Now imagine drawing a line segment from one outer cusp (full moon) to the next. In ...


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What is the reason for this difference between assumed and actual path variation? The orbit of a moon around the sun depends on the time to orbit the planet and the planet's time to orbit the sun. In the case where the moon takes a long time to orbit the planet (like the Earth-Moon), the orbit just wiggles along the circle. In the case where the moon ...


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What would be the practical consequences (on earth) if the Moon was not tidally locked? Honestly, I think the consequences would be pretty small, except we'd see the dark side of the moon from time to time. On the moon, the consequences would be bigger. All tidally locked means is that the moon's rotation matches the moon's orbit, so that the same ...


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If the Moon was not tidally locked, it would mean that the Moon is in the wrong orbital distance from Earth. The Moon is tidally locked because it is close to the Earth. If the moon were closer, it would approach the Earth's roche limit, be torn apart, and its debris would become a ring for ~100-200 million years. If it were too far, it would continue to ...


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You cannot see it from Earth, it is too small and too far away. However the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter imaged it.



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