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1

The tide would be locked in place, roughly, because the Moon always shows the same side to the Earth (tidally locked). But the height of the water at the location facing the Earth and the opposite side should be greater than the mean height, and at the limb, as we see it, the height will be lower than the mean but by half the magnitude of the high tide. ...


4

It's pretty simple, actually. The Moon creates tides. Due to tides, the water bulges out towards the Moon (and also on the opposite side). But the Earth also rotates pretty fast (once a day), faster than the Moon orbits the Earth (once a month). There's friction between the rotating Earth, and the watery bulge created by tides. The rotation of the Earth ...


1

Light pollution does not matter for the Moon. Even transparency doesn't matter that much. What does matter is seeing, a.k.a. air turbulence. It is very rare that an exit pupil smaller than 0.5 mm is useful for anything - perhaps for some tight double stars, but that's about it. So take that as a hard lower limit. In terms of a "soft" limit, it depends. If ...


-1

Since the magnification is determined by focal length of the objective/focal length of eyepiece it is difficult to have an eye-piece with the same f ratio as the objective. Assuming pupil aprature 0.25" then the ideal eye-piece aperature will be 0.25" for most effective light transmission of the eye.A generally acceptable f8 would have a focal length of ...


2

We actually know a number of elements present on the lunar surface including oxygen, silicon, iron, magnesium, calcium, aluminium, manganese and titanium. We have also observed that carbon and nitrogen have deposited over time from solar wind.


4

We know a considerable amount about the moon, but the picture is not complete. There are considerable resources available and so much data available that it would take too long to list every aspect of it, so instead the following are examples of resources (with annotations): Our knowledge of lunar geology comes from the results of direct sampling (from ...


1

It is safe to observe anything during the day, as long as you don't point the telescope close to the Sun. Just stay away from the Sun and you'll be fine. Be careful to not accidentally swing the tube in the direction of the Sun. E.g. Mercury is pretty hard to observe at other times than during the day (or dusk), and yet astronomers have been observing it ...


1

I have found a good time to view the moon is before the sky is fully light,say 8am.The pupil of the eye will no be fully dilated and better eye/lens will give improved resolution(f ratio).In addition to this an improved contrast will be achieved as the atmosphere has less reflected light relative to the optical system of the telescope. A friend and I agreed ...


4

As long as you don't directly look at the sun through your telescope, then there is no problem. But don't try to see the moon during solar eclipse without special filters (easily available for your telescope's eyepieces) In my telescope, I have seen the moon day time when there was very light cloud cover. It was awesome scene. You can feel that the moon is ...


0

RE: Always seeing the same side of the moon. It may also be attributed to a difference in density of the moon. It was established recently that there are gravitational variations around the moon that would support the possibility that there is a higher density of material on one side of the moon. The higher density area of moon would then always face the ...


1

Peter,The ability of Mars to retain water vapour is much reduced by its lower gravitational strength and atmospheric density. Can water exist at these parameters continuously, the evidence shows not.


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There would be a tide of approximately 28 days due to centrifuge effect,the water being free flowing,about the mid point centre of gravity of the 2 masses. Our tides are monthly but appear daily due to earth 24hr rotation.Variation in sub-marine land masses and ocean baison cross flow have sub tidal effect that can lag or lead the moon phased tide.On a water ...


0

It would have to be a big meteorite to supply the quantaties we have here and therefore support the nuclear break down theory.ie- hydrogen to helium etc. In respect of delivery by cosmic objects the atmospheric pressure on the moon would result in a low boiling point and the evaporation velocity(due to low gravational attraction) would exceed the escape ...


2

@DavidHammen is essentially correct. According to stellarium, the Sun gets as high as 89 58' 48":



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