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The redness of the moon is due to Earth's atmosphere refraction of Sun rays and pollution - dust particles etc. The intensity of the colouring will depend on the path the moon takes through the Earth's corona. If it goes right through the middle then we will see a darker moon, while if it travels close to the edges then the influence of refraction and ...


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The coincidence isn't so much that they appear very similar sizes from Earth, but that we are alive to see them at the point in time in which they appear very similar sizes. The moon is slowly moving away from the Earth, and at some point in the future the moon will be unable to totally eclipse the sun and conversely, if you could step far into prehistory, ...


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As a matter of fact, yes, it is only a coincidence.


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No, not all total lunar eclipses will turn the Moon deep red. Most of them do, but not all. If you were standing on the Moon during the eclipse, you'd see the Earth passing in front of, and obscuring, the Sun. But the Earth will never become fully dark, even when the Sun is fully covered. A bright ring will always surround the Earth. Why? That ring is ...


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It would look like this (actual picture of the Earth, seen from the Moon, during a lunar eclipse): Link to full page: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140407.html The Earth would appear surrounded by a bright ring, even though the Sun is completely hidden behind it. The ring is sunlight refracted through the atmosphere. It's basically all the sunrises and ...


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During a lunar eclipse on Earth, the Sun would be eclipsed by the Earth as seen from the Moon: $\hspace{3cm}$ What this animation does not show is the corona around the Sun (which would be partially visible when the sun has been occulted) and the reddish ring of light that would encircle the Earth due to the sunlight refracted by the atmosphere of the ...


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Yeah, you'll see earth as all dark, if it is total lunar eclipse. In a Lunar eclipse earth comes in between the sun and the moon. Because of this, the sun rays don't reach the surface of moon. Now answer to your question: As earth's sunward side is blocking light the other side will be darker. As you are standing towards shadowed side of earth, you ...


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It would look like a solar eclipse! What happens is that Earth gets in the way between the Sun and the Moon. From Earth we see the Moon disappear, from the Moon one would see the Sun disappear. Earth is fix on the Moon's sky, because the Moon always turns the same side towards Earth. Earth as seen from the Moon has phases, like the Moon has when seen from ...


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Pretty most all lunar eclipses will turn the moon red like that. The amount of redness does vary, and sometimes so little light gets to the sun it is almost completely dark. However the redness is so typical of a lunar eclipse that NASA describes it as a "characteristic orange-red color". That link has a neat table with a categorization of the colour ranges. ...


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That's no good idea. Earth wouldn't necessarily fall into Jupiter in the short run, provided it orbits Jupiter fast enough (within about 1.7 days), and on a circular orbit, but we would risk to collide with Io, destroy it by tidal forces, or change its orbit heavily. The other Galilean moons would get out of sync and change their orbits over time. Tides ...


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The water for high tides needs to come from somewhere; the mean sea level should stay approximately constant, as long as wind is neglected. That way tides are a kind of oscillations. In the first of the two diagrams a low low tide is followed by a high high tide, and a high low tide is followed by a low high tide. That way the mean sea level, averaged over ...


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You need to be careful about which port or beach you take the data from. It is not the same to measure tides on the eastern side of a gulf than on the western side, due to Moon's motion, and also it is not the same to take data at the far end of a gulf than on its mouth. I think this last thing is what happens to your data.


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As an complement to the other answers, let me address the question of why planets tend towards tidal locking. In short, the torque applied by the differential gravitational force between both sides of the surface of the planet induces friction, which in turn dissipates aways the excess spin of the (proto) moon when it is not tidally locked. When locking ...


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It's mainly by the clear definition of the rings, and their mere existence. Without a moon the rings would be short-lived, hence unlikely to be detected just in time shortly after they've formed. And they would tend to wash out to broader rings. The space between the rings seems to be empty. That's easier to explain by one or more moons keeping the gap ...



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