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11

The Hubble expansion has no bearing whatsoever on the length of the year. This is because the whole Milky Way galaxy (and in fact most galaxies, if not all, and even local groups) has decoupled from the Hubble flow long ago. In fact, it could only form after it decoupled. Note that M31, our sister galaxy, is in fact falling onto the Milky Way rather than ...


9

(Disclaimer: As I already pointed out in a comment to the question above, I never did a calculation with $H_0$ before and I might be utterly, horrible wrong with my interpretation.) If you completely ignore the slowly changing orbit of earth and only take expansion of space into account and assume the Hubble-parameter to be pretty constant in the timeframe ...


6

Stellar clusters around supermassive black holes are systems in which relativity likely plays a role. Currently, only bright stars can be seen in our own galactic center because there is a ton of neutral gas between us and the galactic center that obscures it. As a result, we only have a few "test particles" out of the many stars that actually orbit the ...


2

I can attempt to address the second part of your initial question: "Is it a particle, a wave,...?" Einstein's theory of general relativity states that mass and energy bend space-time. Space-time, in turn, tells matter how to move (John Wheeler put this more elegantly). This concept is completely different from the theories of the other three fundamental ...


2

Adding to @Guillochon's answer, there are even a number of general relativistic tests in our solar system, the most famous being the precession of the perihelion of Mercury. In short, the location of the point of closest approach to the Sun (perihelion) for the planet Mercury is a changing quantity. Essentially, given one full revolution, it doesn't trace ...



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