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13

The Hubble expansion has no bearing whatsoever on the length of the year. This is because the whole Milky Way galaxy (and in fact most galaxies, if not all, and even local groups) has decoupled from the Hubble flow long ago. In fact, it could only form after it decoupled. Note that M31, our sister galaxy, is in fact falling onto the Milky Way rather than ...


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(Disclaimer: As I already pointed out in a comment to the question above, I never did a calculation with $H_0$ before and I might be utterly, horrible wrong with my interpretation.) If you completely ignore the slowly changing orbit of earth and only take expansion of space into account and assume the Hubble-parameter to be pretty constant in the timeframe ...


6

Stellar clusters around supermassive black holes are systems in which relativity likely plays a role. Currently, only bright stars can be seen in our own galactic center because there is a ton of neutral gas between us and the galactic center that obscures it. As a result, we only have a few "test particles" out of the many stars that actually orbit the ...


3

A photon is an entity defined in the context of a relativistic field theory, and so it doesn't really make sense to talk about the Newtonian bending of a photon. Necessarily, we need to substitute an analogous question that's sensible in the Newtonian framework. To do so, we can imagine a classical corpuscle of light--appropriately enough, a theory of light ...


3

If you're asking whether it's sufficient to use a retarded (time-delayed) positions to calculate gravitational forces, then no, that would be much worse than Newtonian gravity. For example, that would predict that the Earth should spiral into the Sun on the order of about 400 years. See also this question. Most small-scale N-body simulations (e.g., ...


3

If you project the orbits onto a plane, for example the plane of the ecliptic, the projections will cross. But that's only because you're looking at a 3D problem in 2D. If you look at the orbits in 3D, you'll see that Pluto's orbit is highly inclined (17ยบ) from the ecliptic, so it never actually passes through Neptune's orbit. Each time it seems to cross (in ...


2

I can attempt to address the second part of your initial question: "Is it a particle, a wave,...?" Einstein's theory of general relativity states that mass and energy bend space-time. Space-time, in turn, tells matter how to move (John Wheeler put this more elegantly). This concept is completely different from the theories of the other three fundamental ...


2

Adding to @Guillochon's answer, there are even a number of general relativistic tests in our solar system, the most famous being the precession of the perihelion of Mercury. In short, the location of the point of closest approach to the Sun (perihelion) for the planet Mercury is a changing quantity. Essentially, given one full revolution, it doesn't trace ...


2

"in a spherically symmetric distribution of matter, a particle feels no force at all from the material at greater radii, and the material at smaller radii gives exactly the force which one would get if all the material was concentrated at the central point". This may be poorly worded. The idea is not that the distance from the center of the body must be ...


2

The Newtonian gravitational acceleration of a test object (a small object with negligible mass) toward a point mass is given by $$\vec g =\frac {GM}{||\vec r||^3} \vec r \tag{1}$$ where $\vec g$ is the acceleration vector, $G$ is the Newtonian gravitational constant, $M$ is the mass of the point mass, and $\vec r$ is the displacement vector directed from ...


2

Running the math for a 5 meter long pendulum and 1 kg mass, I get an amplitude of 0,017 mm. You are off by quite a bit. There is essentially no horizontal deflection when the Moon is at the horizon. The maximum horizontal deflection occurs when the Moon is about 45 degrees above or below the horizon. The tidal acceleration at some point on the surface ...


1

Newtonian treatments of the bending of light go back to Laplace who, in 1798, wrote about light escaping from massive bodies, ie: black holes! See Appendix A of Hawking and Ellis "Large Scale Structure of Space-Time" where there is a nice translation of Laplace's paper. Newtonian treatments cannot properly deal with all aspects of light bending. Notably, ...


1

This sounds very ambitious! I think your way in to this topic might be to have a look at the works of two authors - Matthew Bate and Mark Krumholz. The reason I suggest these two names is that they are representative of the two basic approaches to simulating the collapse of molecular clouds (which has little to do with n-body simulations). These approaches ...


1

The original result is Newton's shell theorem. Since we can break up a spherically symmetric distribution into spherically symmetric concentric shells, it is sufficient to consider the corresponding statement for one such shell: for each shell taken individually, there is no force on a particle inside, and a force on a particle outside as if all of the mass ...



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