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3

Conceptually, the average is over an average year. Practically, that's not what's done anymore. Sidereal time is much more readily measured than is solar time. Radio astronomy can measure the position of remote quasars much, much more precisely than they can measure the position of the Sun. The Sun is a big fiery blob with a not quite-well defined surface. ...


3

At any given instant of time, in any place on Earth, if the sky is clear and the horizon is low and flat, you see half of the celestial sphere - at that very instant. But as the Earth keeps turning, you may end up seeing more, depending on where you are. If you're at the North or South Pole, you see exactly half of the sky no matter how long you wait. ...


1

Normal case: The effect would not be very noticeable unless the large planet was extremely large / high gravity (e.g. it would look "almost" normal) looking at one another. If the planet was that large, it would probably not be able to support life, but to see what would happen, lets assume it can support life. Relativistic case, from the large planet, ...


12

Still new at stellarium but here are some quick capture gif lasting one month. Sorry about the quality- limited to 256 colors for smaller gifs. Date on lower left corner. By the way the sun is of course the brightest and i use it as reference for recording (start record when sun is in frame then stop when it appears again in the same position which is ...


4

To expand a little more, yes the Earth would hang in the same spot in the sky, moving around in a small circle as the moon rotated around it over the course of each of its 28 day orbits. It would have phases, full Earth when the moon is between it and the sun, new Earth when the Earth is between the moon and the sun, and wax and wane between these two ...


14

To add to Mark Bailey's answer; the Earth would indeed hang in the sky and rotate, but it would also wax and wane over the course of a lunar day (27.3 Earth-days). Starting at lunar dawn, the Earth would be half-full. The Earth would then wane (more shadow) towards lunar noon. At lunar noon, the Earth would be all in shadow (New Earth) and quite close to ...


28

You are correct. The Earth would always appear in approximately the same location in the sky, when viewed from a point on the lunar surface. And it would be seen to spin, the continents coming in and out of view over the course of an Earth day (24 hours). The sun would make it's way across the sky, from one horizon to the other over a period of about two ...



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