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Current estimates put Apophis's diameter around 325 m and its 2029-04-13 approach about 38000 km from the center of the Earth. I figure an angular size <= 2 arcsec, almost starlike even if you manage to track it in a telescope. Ephemerides show it at apparent magnitude 3.5 or so just before closest approach - visible but not outstanding to the unaided eye ...


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I've just rewritten this answer - @MikeG caught a glaring error by pointing out a really basic handy relationship called the Rayleigh criterion. \begin{align} {\theta}_R \approx1.22 \frac{\lambda}{D}. \end{align} It's better to read the (or any) article, but very briefly, the angular resolution is roughly the ratio of the wavelength to the diameter of a ...


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As Conrad Turner notes, that talk is about a device for blocking the light from another star (one you think might have planets orbiting around it). It's not for blocking the light of the Sun! If you try to look at a planet orbiting around another star, the glare from the star makes it very hard to see the planet. By placing a specially shaped device in ...


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The magnitude scale is a logarithmic scale. An increase of 1 magnitude corresponds to a decrease in brightness of about 2,5 times dimmer. Vega, a bright star has a magnitude of 0, so any star that is brighter than Vega would have a magnitude that is less than 0. This is an odd system; the reason for it is historical. The ancient Greeks ordered stars by ...


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Apparent magnitude is measure of how bright an object appears to an observer on Earth, meaning it's a function of both the object's intrinsic luminosity and its distance from us. The concept of magnitudes dates back to the Ancient Greeks, when stars in the sky were categorized into six magnitudes (the brightest being 1 and the faintest being 6). Each ...


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Does that suggest that about a half of the stars in the observable universe could not belong to any galaxy? Not really. A key sentence in the article is "The best interpretation is that we are seeing light from stars outside of galaxies but in the same dark matter halo". So the stars are still within the dark matter halo of a galaxy, but are outside ...



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