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The relative direction to an object depends mainly on two things: The location of the observer and the object The coordinate system you use to determine direction. So the first part of that concerns where we are compared with Polaris (and by extension of your question, where the other stars are as well). Yes the stars and other components of the galaxy ...


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What is the most populated/numerous stellar system in which the orbits of all objects are known? The answer is none. Other than our own solar system, astronomers don't know if they know all of the large bodies (aka planets) orbiting any given star system. Presumably other star systems have asteroids, comets, and other stuff. The orbits of those small bodies ...


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I have done a lot more research into this and found an answer. It comes down to solving Kepler's Equation, and my main references are: Kepler's equation and the Equation of Centre which gives an iterative method for solving the equation, and Determination of Position in Orbits which has the formulae for calculating orbital coordinates. Here is the ...


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The Sun is of course in motion with respect to other stars in our Galaxy, but it does not move quickly compared with the vast distances involved. For instance it takes about 220 million years for our Sun to orbit the Galaxy once, travelling at around 200 km/s. The stars that are closest to the Sun tend to be orbiting in more-or-less the same direction and at ...


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According to Vokrouhlicky et al. 2015 Yarkovsky forces can be measured for small bodies with diameters up to 30-40 km. The largest object they have in their list of Yarkovsky detections is 4179 Toutatis with a diameter of (only) 2.8 km. I am not aware if Yarkovsky forces have been measured on anything larger than asteroids.



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