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7

EDIT: As it turns out, I'm not the first or even the second person to run calculations like this: https://www.fourmilab.ch/documents/canon_transits/ http://www.solexorb.it/SolexOld/Simtrans.pdf Meeus' work (second link) mentions the 13425 CE event in "Table 1. Simultaneous and near-simultaneous transits of Mercury and Venus, years 1 to 300,000" Within ...


5

Like it was already pointed out in the comments, your assertions and assumptions are way off today's well-accepted theories. Nonetheless, I'll try to answer you questions. Will our solar system die of old age in 5.4 billion years Our sun is a G-type main-sequence star with an estimated lifespan of roughly 10 billion years. Like you mentioned, it is about ...


4

There may be Sednoids there. Sednoids are a hypothetical class of "inner Oort Cloud objects" named after their prototype, Sedna. Sedna's aphelion is ~936 AU, bringing it close to the inner boundary of the Oort Cloud. Sednoids may have aphelions ranging from about 100 AU to 1,000 AU. The problem is, only two Sednoids have beet detected to date, 90377 Sedna ...


4

As others have calculated, there are no predicted double transits. Since Venus transits for about 12 hours each hundred years (roughly), Venus is in transit for about 1/100000 of the time. Thus there is a (roughly) 1 in 100000 chance that a randomly chosen transit of mercury will coincide with a transit of Venus. Since Transits of Mercury occur every 10 ...


2

I am assuming that the question you want answered is how to calculate the elevation of an orbit above a reference plane given the orbital inclination with this plane. If so, please update your question to reflect this, heeding the advice given in the comments. Kepler's first law tells us that Planet's move in elliptical orbits, which we can define as ...


1

The Kuiper belt and the Scattered disk are widely believed to lie in the space between the outer planets and the Oort cloud, but not to reach all the way out to the Oort cloud (apparently due to resonances with Neptune and a scarcity of sighted object much outside the 1:2 resonance orbit). The various dwarf planets of the outer solar system are sometimes ...


1

[Not sure if I should answer this, but I will try to answer something while trying hard to not go off-topic.] The planets aspects Mercury surface is essentially a collection of small random craters with no discernible pattern at all, so you might not consider which side is presented. The only distinguished feature is a set of dark craters in its north ...


1

I am not very familiar with orbital dynamics (so please correct me if I'm wrong). I was told that, for instance in the case of the mean motion resonances that cause the majority of the Kirkwood gaps in the asteroid belt, not only the ratio of the periods, but also the timing is important. Let's take Pluto as an example, which is in 2:3 resonance with ...



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