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There is a wonderful post at Physics Stackexchange: Gravitational coupling between the Moon and the tidal bulge nearest the Moon acts as a torque on the Earth's rotation, draining angular momentum and rotational kinetic energy from the Earth's spin. In turn, angular momentum is added to the Moon's orbit, accelerating it, which lifts the Moon into a ...


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The heat production inside moons is due to tidal heating. Due to this, the orbit of the moon would change. The orbital and rotational energy of the moon is dissipated as heat either in the surface ocean or in the interior of the moon. This is especially seen in the moons of large planets, for example Io. Io, being Jupiter's innermost moon, is pulled by ...


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In different systems, the cloud that creates it starts with one direction of angular momentum (spin). This is because of the initial conditions as the gas cloud collapsed in on itself to create a star and planets around it. However, some orbits will move in the opposite direction but will normally be destroyed due to collisions with other orbits in the ...


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This video provides a visual answer: https://youtu.be/MTY1Kje0yLg?t=3m24s objects orbiting in different directions are more likely to collide with each other. By the process of elimination, eventually one direction of orbit dominates.


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If you are orbiting a 1-sun-mass black hole at 1 AU, gravity-wise it would be just like it is for us orbiting the sun. Gravity is gravity and mass is mass. The planets would have to have been captured after formation of the black hole or moved in from distant orbits. However, the accretion disk would be likely to be emitting lots of X-rays and not ...


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The axis points in pretty much the same direction all the time, though it does wobble slightly, ranging between 22.1 degrees and 24.5 degrees every 41,000 years. (Source) Perpendicular between two lines is a 2 dimensional property, so, while the axis is never "straight up" so to speak, there is a 90 degree angle between the axis and the line between the ...


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Pure coincidence. Your result of 2 is better written as 2 meters/kilometer/second. If we had six fingers on each hand we would probably use base twelve rather than base ten. A base 12 metric system would have 1728 (in our base 10) meters in a kilometer. Your coincidence would vanish in a twelve-fingered world. Our Earth takes 86400 seconds to make one ...


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It is a co-incidence. The units are what you need to look at, in both the speed of light and the distance of the Sun the units of length are the same (m) (your ratio is $\approx 0.002 s^{-1}$ when you use metres as the unit for the distance to the Sun). The definition of the second is in a sense arbitrary and is a consequence of how we have chosen to ...



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