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Light travels in straight lines in spacetime, but not necessarily straight lines through space, and the same is true for free-falling orbits of test particles like satellites (when thrust-less). However, in relativity what constitutes 'space' means taking some 'slice of now' through spacetime, which is of course depends on the reference frame one chooses to ...


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I presume what you mean is how does the plane of the orbit compare to the equatorial rotation plane of the star? The answer is, you can sort of estimate this, by using something called the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (see also Rossiter 1924; McLaughlin 1924). You can find plenty of information on the web - I'll add a couple of links when I have a moment - ...


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Is there any way to find the angle of the orbital plane of the exoplanet orbiting its parent star? It's unclear what precisely you're asking. The planet will be orbiting (to very good approximation) on a Keplerian orbit (closed ellipse co-focal with the parent star). Such an orbit has two relevant angles. One is the angle between the orbital plane and the ...


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Charon and Pluto are bad examples. They have comparable mass: Pluto only 9 times heavier that Charon (Earth is 81 times more massive than Moon), so center of mass in that system lies outside main body (about 1000 km from the Pluto surface). Main problem for satellites is Roche limit. For the Eath-Moon system Roche radius is about 15500 km from center to ...


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You can see an example of tidal locking and atmosphere simulation for a planet closely orbiting a dim star. They show a simulation of the atmosphere and some interesting theories about the movement of gasses due to tidal locking (convection) that occurs between the bright and dark side of the planet. The link goes directly to the discussion of tidal ...



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