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The Summer Solstice in 2016 will occur at 22:34 UT on the 20th June, and the full moon will occur at 11:02 UT on that day (but since they are 12 hours apart that won't be on the same day everywhere). Solstice data from here (GMT- Grenwich Mean Time =UT) New and full moon data from here (UTC- Coordinated Universal Time =GMT=UT)


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No. The sun does not revolve around another big star. It revolves around the center of our galaxy along with the whole solar system, including comets, asteroids, and a large amount of other stars and stellar systems. As per some theories, however, at the center of our Milky Way galaxy lies a Super Massive black hole, which was essentially once a huge ...


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Yes. A web search for "photo sun glint space" turns up a number of images, including this one. (I really wanted to just say "Yes." with the photo, but it wouldn't accept it.)


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Most probably not! But that being said, it also depends on "how far" you have travelled above the surface. The earth is surrounded by a multitude of different things at different levels from the ground, like clouds, smoke, satellites and satellite-debris etc. which we come across progressively on the outward journey. At lower levels we may get a somewhat ...


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It's called sunglint. This can be problematic for Earth-observing satellites in low Earth orbit. Such satellites typically don't take a "picture". They instead continuously scan the Earth a line at a time. This means the sunglint moves with the satellite. You can see this effect yourself while flying in an airplane. Little ribbons of rivers and lakes can ...


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I think what this photo is actually capturing is the reflection of the sun off of the ocean's surface. Were the sun over a landmass, I don't think this "reflection" would be seen.


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[NOTE: The animated GIFs are too large to copy into this post, but the URLs should work] http://test.bcinfo3.barrycarter.info/farmoon.gif The image above would apply if: the Earth and Moon both had circular orbits (approximately true) the Moon's siderial period was exactly 1/12th year (approximately true) the Earth's distance from the Sun was 150 ...


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Not an answer, but I thought this was a good slice of a picture of the Moon's orbit around the sun. Source: http://www.wired.com/2012/12/does-the-moon-orbit-the-sun-or-the-earth/


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What is the reason for this difference between assumed and actual path variation? Even your second image isn't correct. Imagine zooming in on a small portion of the Moon's orbit about the Sun, for example, one full moon to the next, with the Sun zoomed out of the picture. Now imagine drawing a line segment from one outer cusp (full moon) to the next. In ...


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This is known as spectroscopy. Every molecule and atom in the universe emits and absorbs light at specific frequencies. This is a result of the quantization of the energy levels (for electrons) in an atom. Although there are lots of complicating factors, such as redshift, to account for, the patterns are usually so distinctive that the complications can ...


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What is the reason for this difference between assumed and actual path variation? The orbit of a moon around the sun depends on the time to orbit the planet and the planet's time to orbit the sun. In the case where the moon takes a long time to orbit the planet (like the Earth-Moon), the orbit just wiggles along the circle. In the case where the moon ...


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It is not unusual to have pairs of pairs or even more complex stellar systems. Two stars make a stable pair. A pair of these make a stable system and a pair of these would also make a stable system. It is, however, necessary for stability for each pair to be separated by roughly 10 or more times the separation of the previous level. This could continue ...



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