Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Perhaps one way of answering this is to note that the (approximately) dipole magnetic fields of a magnetar fall off radially as something like $r^{-3}$. So at the magnetar surface the fields could be of order $10^{11}$ Teslas (at a maximum), but these are reduced by a factor of $\sim 8$ at 2 magnetar radii, a factor of $\sim 27$ at 3 magnetar radii etc. Now ...


3

Completely disregarding magnetic fields for now, an extremely dense object like a magnetar (which is a kind of pulsar, which itself is a kind of neutron star) could destroy planets just with gravity (see Roche Limit). Now, if the planet is far away from the star, things might not be necessarily that ominous. The problem with electromagnetic forces is that ...


3

Go out in the daytime and practice lining up on the leaves of trees on a distant hill or some such. It's easier to find targets when they aren't against a nearly featureless black backdrop. If you have a finder scope, likewise align it to the scope's view using a distant daytime target. At night, look first for the moon to get a feel for how aligning ...


3

Lots of frontier science lectures to watch on nearby topics here: https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/seminars/ Your very question seems to be the hottest topic in astronomy today. My impression is that if oxygen gas and methane were on the same exoplanet, then it certainly must be living biological processing creating that there. Nothing else could explain the ...


0

I don't see why this question would be down voted. I think that the most we could determine is that the conditions for life are present on a Planet. The only way to know for certain would be to actually go there . However we could perhaps detect certain gases that could only be emitted from living organisms and this would be be some proof.


0

Well without your big brother jupiter looking out for poor little earth then life on earth wouldn't be possible (most likely, but definitely not intelligent life as it has taken us millions of years to evolve to this point, and meteor collisions would increase at an alarming rate). You receive a force on your body from all the planets in the solar system and ...


2

Did you mean to ask Would life on Earth be possible if Earth was the only planet in the Solar system? The answer is perhaps , we can only speculate and know too little about the evolution of the planetary system to give any firm answer. The Moon, for example, (not a planet I know) stabilises the Earth spin axis, preventing it from flipping, which would ...


0

Without just disregarding your question as one of a philosophical nature, the significance is irrelevant in the context of what you are asking. Other planets are a consequence of the evolution of our solar system - accretion of matter, gravitational influence, energy from the sun etc. - they aren't there for any 'reason'. Energy from other planets (and ...


3

No, that is not possible. There are quite a few capable telescopes studying the Sun since some decades. Already Galileo stared at the Sun until he got blind. Don't you think a planet would've been detected if it passed by in images like these? But Sun grazing comets are pretty common visitors in the corona. It is a bit weird that a couple of percent of ...


4

It is very unlikely. While the hypothetical planet Vulcan between Mercury and the Sun was ruled out many decades ago searches for Vulcanoid asteroids would very likely have detected anything that might qualify as a intra-Mercurial planet.



Top 50 recent answers are included