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There is a wonderful post at Physics Stackexchange: Gravitational coupling between the Moon and the tidal bulge nearest the Moon acts as a torque on the Earth's rotation, draining angular momentum and rotational kinetic energy from the Earth's spin. In turn, angular momentum is added to the Moon's orbit, accelerating it, which lifts the Moon into a ...


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No, it doesn't work like that. A rocky planet, to first order, will probably contain a similar mix of elements to the Earth. The most likely reason that the star has a low metallicity is because it is old, and formed when the interstellar medium was less metal rich. But because rocky planets do not incorporate (much) hydrogen and helium, what you are ...


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Yes, according to this recent news an aurora has been found on the brown dwarf LSR J1835+3259 which is 18½ light years from here. I suppose that an aurora which is a million times more powerful than those on Earth comes together with some kind of van Allen Belts, but real astronomers maybe have more imagination. An M class brown dwarf is maybe not the ...


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Mars does not have a magnetic field of any strength and so does not have a van Allen belt (and this is a serious problem for potential human exploration of the planet). Similarly, neither Venus nor Mercury (nor the Moon, which is arguably part of a two-planet system with the Earth) have a van Allen belt. The gaseous giants do, however, have radiation belts ...



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