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It's just called "the Solar System". (Plenty of places and objects have names like that; it's no different from "the Arctic" or "the Moon" or "the Sun".) ("Sol system" is an invention of science fiction writers; it has no general use outside some science fiction contexts. Anything else is going to be something similar, or general crackpottery of one kind or ...


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If the Moon was not tidally locked, it would mean that the Moon is in the wrong orbital distance from Earth. The Moon is tidally locked because it is close to the Earth. If the moon were closer, it would approach the Earth's roche limit, be torn apart, and its debris would become a ring for ~100-200 million years. If it were too far, it would continue to ...


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Are you asking how to measure a day for an exoplanet? Because that is pretty hard given that they are far away and hard to image their surfaces. But, if you are asking how to define the day, say for simulations, then that is pretty easy, actually. From Wikipedi's entry on Day. For a given planet, there are three types of day defined in astronomy: ...


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Outside my field, but collecting information from the Wiki article, I can make an attempt nevertheless: You're right that we will probably pass through Oort-like clouds of other stars. But the largest of the planetesimals of the Oort Cloud is measured in kilometres, whereas the distance between these objects is measured in AU, so the total cross section of ...


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It's at Jupiter's distance and beyond that ices were able to form out of the disk of material surrounding the early sun. Go much further in and there is too much energy from the sun for them to stay as solids (and will sublimate into gases); this is why asteroids are principally rocks and metals. So at this distance more of the materials of the planetary ...


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Here's something from Wikipedia (emphasis mine): The giant planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) formed further out, beyond the frost line, the point between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter where the material is cool enough for volatile icy compounds to remain solid. The ices that formed the Jovian planets were more abundant than the metals and ...


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What would be the practical consequences (on earth) if the Moon was not tidally locked? Honestly, I think the consequences would be pretty small, except we'd see the dark side of the moon from time to time. On the moon, the consequences would be bigger. All tidally locked means is that the moon's rotation matches the moon's orbit, so that the same ...


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The wikipedia page you linked to tells you that the solar system is gravitationally "chaotic", in part because the mass of the sun is not fixed over time. But even more simply than that, focusing just on the gravity (ignoring loss of stellar mass, etc.), the solar system is an N-body problem. We have 8 planets, a sun, and millions of asteroids, comets, and ...


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To answer your question succinctly, the Solar System also goes by the names: The Copernican System, The Heliocentric System, and The Planetary System, in addition to the ones you have mentioned. There aren't too many other names, actually, so just stick to Solar System since it's the most widely accepted.


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A direct cribbing of the wiki's page for the frost line: In astronomy or planetary science, the frost line, also known as the snow line or ice line, is the particular distance in the solar nebula from the central protostar where it is cold enough for volatile compounds such as water, ammonia, methane, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide to condense into ...



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