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Perhaps the way to answer this is ask - could we detect the planets in our solar system if we were looking at the Sun, using current technology, from distances of many light years? The short answer is that we could detect Jupiter using the Doppler radial velocity technique, if we observed for more than 10 years (at least one orbit is required). If we were ...


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There are two things to consider when thinking about this. The first is that by virtue of living within our solar system, we are much closer to our planets, have a much easier time seeing and documenting them. We can point ground based telescopes at them and get reasonably detailed pictures of them. The point is, since we're so close, we're less likely to ...


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I believe NASA is stating it is not only when solar wind but gravitational pull shifts... That's not to say the sun has no pull or solar wind but that the influence of the sun is now less than the surrounding environment. To put it simply, when the sun is no longer winning the tug of war.


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If you're only interested in the positions, you'll probably be best off just using a program instead of diving into celestial mechanics. Depending on what you exactly want with "planetary position", here are three different approaches to finding a planet's position at a given time: Stellarium is a free program to visually solve for the position of a ...


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The accretion disc is formed by material in orbital motion against a central body, which can be a star. The size, mass and other characteristics are usually determined by the central object, in this case the star. In general, the protoplanetary accretion discs are the largest ones (with the largest mass) and as the age on the central star increases, the ...



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