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yes it is possible by very few different ways. https://www.uwgb.edu/dutchs/pseudosc/flipaxis.htm Nothing acting solely from on or within the Earth could change its orbit or seriously alter its rotation. One way to move an object is to throw mass in the opposite direction, the way jets or rockets do. If we think really big and imagine blasting a chunk out ...


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Yes. Even with todays technology we can get started. In this article by Korycansky et al 2001 it is suggested to use rockets to move an asteroid (like a larger version of the NASA ARM Asteroid Redirect Mission) to a cycling orbit between Earth and Jupiter. The asteroid would pass near infront of the Earth in order to give the Earth a slight gravity assist ...


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Another way to look at this question is to consider how elements are produced. The elements with larger atomic numbers (i.e.: 26 (iron) or so) on the periodic table are primarily produced during supernovae explosions. Based on a lot of findings in stellar physics and nuclear physics in the past half century, it's unlikely that a transfermionic element (an ...


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Yes, it is possible to use the sun as a gravitational lens and to achieve better telescopic viewing. As you know space is curved by mass and so light is deflected by mass, it is possible to focus light using gravitational lenses and thus achieving greater telescopic viewing. However, the sun does have corona fluctuations around it. So, to better exploit the ...


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Further to the answer of @Jonathan, the thing that distinguishes one chemical element from another is the number of protons in the nucleus, which in turn determines the number of orbital electrons in the uncharged atom. But we already know the element that corresponds to any given number of protons between 1 and 112; that's the atomic number. And you can't ...


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As far as elements (e.g. on the periodic table) go, I would say the odds are very slim. We already discovered or produced all the elements of the Periodic Table up to atomic number 112 at least. As the number increases, the half lives of the elements generally decreases, and is very short for elements above 102. If this trend holds true as the number ...



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