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I just found the answer to my question at this place: http://astronomynow.com/2015/02/18/suns-close-encounter-with-scholzsstar/ Here is the answer: Currently, Scholz’s Star is a small, dim red dwarf in the constellation of Monoceros, about 20 light-years away. However, at the closest point in its flyby of the solar system, Scholz’s Star would have ...


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The Wikipedia Precession article explains this. Precession of the Earth's axis is caused mainly by the Sun's gravity acting on the oblate spheriod of the Earth. The Earth bulges at the equator and the force of the Sun's gravity on the bulge makes the axis wobble like a child's spinning top - the axis traces out a cone shape in space. It has no effect on the ...


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So to refer to objects beyond Neptune you use 'trans-Neptunian objects'. It really sounds simple, there are several sub-sets of trans-Neptunian objects: referring to minor-planets (neither Planets nor comets) that exist in this region of the Solar System.


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Well without your big brother jupiter looking out for poor little earth then life on earth wouldn't be possible (most likely, but definitely not intelligent life as it has taken us millions of years to evolve to this point, and meteor collisions would increase at an alarming rate). You receive a force on your body from all the planets in the solar system and ...


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Yes there is a difference, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a subset of Trans Neptunian Objects (TNOs). Other subsets are Oort-cloud objects (OCOs) and scattered disk objects (SDOs). These are not KBOs but they are TNOs. See for instance this wikipedia page.


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You're probably asking the wrong question - which I am going to answer anyway, and after that I am going to answer the question you should have asked instead. As a general rule, there isn't much point in pushing the magnification above 2x the diameter of the instrument, measured in mm. 3 inch, that's 75mm, that's 150x max. Beyond that limit, even under ...


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In typical seeing condition you should be able to use a magnification (see here) of about 25-30x per inch of apperture, so for your telescope that is about 100x, in exceptional condition you could push that up to maybe double that. Also the more magnification you use the less contrast you will have in the image, so really you want the lowest magnification ...


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Did you mean to ask Would life on Earth be possible if Earth was the only planet in the Solar system? The answer is perhaps , we can only speculate and know too little about the evolution of the planetary system to give any firm answer. The Moon, for example, (not a planet I know) stabilises the Earth spin axis, preventing it from flipping, which would ...


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Without just disregarding your question as one of a philosophical nature, the significance is irrelevant in the context of what you are asking. Other planets are a consequence of the evolution of our solar system - accretion of matter, gravitational influence, energy from the sun etc. - they aren't there for any 'reason'. Energy from other planets (and ...


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The simple answer is that the composition in terms of elements doesn't matter for the colour, since that is determined by the molecular composition as well as state (pressure and temperature) of the visual layers (which contain a small but significant fraction of other elements than H and He). Given the differences in the giant planets temperature and ...


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You could just have Googled this question. Post #5 from the first hit: First off, by "wondering what colors different gas giants can be", you are presumably asking about their light spectra through the visible range of wavelengths (380-720 nm), right?** Light interacts primarily with electrons. It is scattered or absorbed in the presence of ...



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