Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Data from observatory archives is a good way to go. Here is another one with tons of imaging datasets: http://archive.eso.org


4

In addition to the capture mechanisms mentioned by Andy, you also need to take into account the stability of any orbit due to perturbations from tidal effects. E.g. in case of our Moon, there are no stable orbits possible. Every satellite put in orbit around the Moon had had to implement course corrections to prevent it from prematurely crashing into the ...


6

This is due to the mechanics of capture. For one object (moon) to be captured by a another (planet), some energy has to be removed from the system. If the incoming moon has an existing satellite then it would be ejected, carrying a lot of kinetic energy. If a small body were to be captured by the planet/moon combination, it would usually be captured by ...


0

It's pretty easy to create a dataset for yourself using remotely controlled telescopes. I've used iTelescope in the past and had a good experience. Their "starter" account costs $20 and should be good to get you going.


0

Try the NASA data catalog, https://data.nasa.gov/data. Also Try the Keck Observatory Archive, KOA, http://nexsci.caltech.edu/archives/koa/index.shtml. Look for raw images. of clusters or galaxies.


0

You could use archival data, e.g., from the WISE mission: http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/applications/wise/ The data are reduced as well as photometrically and astrometrically calibrated, which should make the image combination a lot easier. Just type in random coordinates and download data for a field with the desired number of frames. You can also try ...


0

Considering the solar system as a closed system, how long until all the planets pass twice by the same position relative to each other? If that means when will the bodies in the solar system simultaneously repeat their positions from some time long ago, the answer almost certainly is never. The only way to get a repeated position amongst a pair of ...


3

It depends how precisely you mean the same position. Take 2 since my previous attempt was ... optimistic. In the late 1970's, the outer planets were moving into a configuration that made a Planetary Grand Tour much cheaper and quicker. They will be in a similar configuration in about 175 years. But when will the planets be in the exact configuration? ...


2

The Kaggle galaxy zoo challenge is an example of a problem begging for ideas from outside the field. Sander Dieleman, with a background in deep learning and feature learning, bravely stepped forward, creating an image classifier utilising convolutional neural networks; his full solution is described fluently here. These kinds of techniques could be applied ...


3

If you have good knowledge of software development and pattern recognition, there are several problems that you could assist in solving. Much of observational astronomy requires long time series data, and removing the noise from this data. I have just left the field where some colleagues are trying to develop some software to use image subtraction techniques ...


4

It depends a bit on how precise you would want to be. A very good discussion on how to calculate the orbits of solar system objects is given in the book by Jean Meeus, Astronomical Algorithms (1999), which is at an advanced amateur level. At professional level you have the Explanatory Supplement to the Astronomical Almanac by Urban and Siedelmann. For ...



Top 50 recent answers are included