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6

It's called sunglint. This can be problematic for Earth-observing satellites in low Earth orbit. Such satellites typically don't take a "picture". They instead continuously scan the Earth a line at a time. This means the sunglint moves with the satellite. You can see this effect yourself while flying in an airplane. Little ribbons of rivers and lakes can ...


6

I think what this photo is actually capturing is the reflection of the sun off of the ocean's surface. Were the sun over a landmass, I don't think this "reflection" would be seen.


4

Yes. A web search for "photo sun glint space" turns up a number of images, including this one. (I really wanted to just say "Yes." with the photo, but it wouldn't accept it.)


3

I am going to assume that what you mean here is "what is the pressure" in the solar wind? There is no "air"! The solar wind is pretty complex, consisting of a "fast wind" observed predominantly at high solar latitudes and a slower more variable wind a low latitudes. Both components essentially consist of an expanding stream of protons, electrons plus a ...


2

This is a variant of pi, or "pomega". In LaTeX, you can get it by using \varpi $$\varpi$$ TeX has a question on the 'var' prefix, and Wikibooks has something relevant. The various forms of pi are present in Unicode as: U+03A0 Π greek capital letter pi (HTML Π · Π) U+03C0 π greek small ...


2

No. The sun does not revolve around another big star. It revolves around the center of our galaxy along with the whole solar system, including comets, asteroids, and a large amount of other stars and stellar systems. As per some theories, however, at the center of our Milky Way galaxy lies a Super Massive black hole, which was essentially once a huge ...


1

The Sun orbits in the Galactic potential. The motion is quite complex; it takes about 230 million years to make a circuit (meaning an orbital speed of around 220 km/s), but at the same time it oscillates up and down with respect to the Galactic plane every $\sim 70$ million years and also wobbles in and out every $\sim 150$ million years (this called ...


1

Most probably not! But that being said, it also depends on "how far" you have travelled above the surface. The earth is surrounded by a multitude of different things at different levels from the ground, like clouds, smoke, satellites and satellite-debris etc. which we come across progressively on the outward journey. At lower levels we may get a somewhat ...


1

To amplify andy256's comment, the problem that solar telescopes face is that heating of the surrounding ground during the day gives rise to turbulence in the air near the ground, making the observing conditions worse (think of the heat shimmer just above the surface of hot pavement or a hot road -- that's turbulence bad enough for your naked eyes to notice). ...



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