Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

That the Moon and Sun both have about the same angular size is just a coincidence; we (humans) just happen to be around at a time when this is so. Tidal torque is causing the Moon to speed up (which in turn is causing the Earth to slow down and the Moon's distance to increase as it gains orbital velocity), so eventually the Moon's angular size will always be ...


0

As the front image on the wikipedia-page already indicates, a total solar eclipse is not always total. Earth's orbit is slightly elliptic, and so is the Moons orbit around the Earth. Now take the Moon's slight orbital inclination into account and far from all total eclipses are really total. Unlike stated usually. In fact wiki states "On average, the Moon ...


0

The Summer Solstice in 2016 will occur at 22:34 UT on the 20th June, and the full moon will occur at 11:02 UT on that day (but since they are 12 hours apart that won't be on the same day everywhere). Solstice data from here (GMT- Grenwich Mean Time =UT) New and full moon data from here (UTC- Coordinated Universal Time =GMT=UT)


2

No. The sun does not revolve around another big star. It revolves around the center of our galaxy along with the whole solar system, including comets, asteroids, and a large amount of other stars and stellar systems. As per some theories, however, at the center of our Milky Way galaxy lies a Super Massive black hole, which was essentially once a huge ...


4

Yes. A web search for "photo sun glint space" turns up a number of images, including this one. (I really wanted to just say "Yes." with the photo, but it wouldn't accept it.)


1

Most probably not! But that being said, it also depends on "how far" you have travelled above the surface. The earth is surrounded by a multitude of different things at different levels from the ground, like clouds, smoke, satellites and satellite-debris etc. which we come across progressively on the outward journey. At lower levels we may get a somewhat ...


2

This is a variant of pi, or "pomega". In LaTeX, you can get it by using \varpi $$\varpi$$ TeX has a question on the 'var' prefix, and Wikibooks has something relevant. The various forms of pi are present in Unicode as: U+03A0 Π greek capital letter pi (HTML Π · Π) U+03C0 π greek small ...


6

It's called sunglint. This can be problematic for Earth-observing satellites in low Earth orbit. Such satellites typically don't take a "picture". They instead continuously scan the Earth a line at a time. This means the sunglint moves with the satellite. You can see this effect yourself while flying in an airplane. Little ribbons of rivers and lakes can ...


6

I think what this photo is actually capturing is the reflection of the sun off of the ocean's surface. Were the sun over a landmass, I don't think this "reflection" would be seen.


1

To amplify andy256's comment, the problem that solar telescopes face is that heating of the surrounding ground during the day gives rise to turbulence in the air near the ground, making the observing conditions worse (think of the heat shimmer just above the surface of hot pavement or a hot road -- that's turbulence bad enough for your naked eyes to notice). ...



Top 50 recent answers are included