Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In general: you make models of the sun, and then you see which one agrees with all observations, and check which temperature this model predicts for the core. A very simple model that gives a good approximation: fusion happens within a small volume in the core, and a part of the released energy is transported to the surface afterwards until it can escape as ...


1

yes it is possible by very few different ways. https://www.uwgb.edu/dutchs/pseudosc/flipaxis.htm Nothing acting solely from on or within the Earth could change its orbit or seriously alter its rotation. One way to move an object is to throw mass in the opposite direction, the way jets or rockets do. If we think really big and imagine blasting a chunk out ...


4

Yes. Even with todays technology we can get started. In this article by Korycansky et al 2001 it is suggested to use rockets to move an asteroid (like a larger version of the NASA ARM Asteroid Redirect Mission) to a cycling orbit between Earth and Jupiter. The asteroid would pass near infront of the Earth in order to give the Earth a slight gravity assist ...


0

Did you consider the degree to radian conversion and vice versa? There seems to be something like that happening. Note that -0.83 is in degrees - which is the correction for the size of the sun and refraction effects at horizon. (More details here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunrise_equation) At latitude 38 N, there shouldn't be any day where ...


5

It moves in circles. At the poles there is no direction defined (east, west, north or south). This is how the sun moves at the north pole: http://www.jaloxa.eu/resources/daylighting/docs/sunpath_90_north.pdf . You can compare it to the other latitudes to get an idea. (http://www.jaloxa.eu/resources/daylighting/sunpath.shtml)


2

Historically, two people (or groups of people) independently came up with different equations to model the blackbody equations in different parts of the spectrum. Rayleigh-Jeans law (classically derived) is valid for longer wavelengths and Wien's law (not Wien's displacement law) is valid for shorter wavelengths. The Planck Distribution approaches the two ...


0

Yes, it is possible to use the sun as a gravitational lens and to achieve better telescopic viewing. As you know space is curved by mass and so light is deflected by mass, it is possible to focus light using gravitational lenses and thus achieving greater telescopic viewing. However, the sun does have corona fluctuations around it. So, to better exploit the ...


0

The Van Allen radiation belt, which is outside of the Earth's magnetic field is believed to get its radiation from solar wind.



Top 50 recent answers are included