Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Before I start, I'll admit that I've criticized the question based on its improbability; however, I've been persuaded otherwise. I'm going to try to do the calculations based on completely different formulas than I think have been used; I hope you'll stay with me as I work it out. Let's imagine that Lucifer becomes a main-sequence star - in fact, let's call ...


1

Of course the apparent relative sizes of the sun and moon are coincidental. What other rational explanation is there? Maybe NASA built the moon that way on purpose. LOL oops ... "For reference, the Moon is currently at a distance of approximately 37.5 Earth radii." I wonder where that odd figure came from. This "37.5" radii figure is very inaccurate. ...


2

In reality, Jupiter doesn't have nearly enough mass to initiate stellar ignition or sustain it if we could somehow start it going. Even the smallest star would require on the order of some 80 to 90 times the mass of Jupiter just to put out a faint red glow. Even to become a brown dwarf proto-star, Jupiter would require a mass increase on the order of at ...


2

Ignoring the impossibility of Jupiter going solar: Assume that Jupiter turns into duplicate of the Sun in terms of energy output. Energy transmitted to the earth follows an inverse-square law. Since Jupiter is, at best, 4 times farther from the Earth than the Sun, Jupiter will supply the Earth with, at most, 1/16 the energy that the Sun supplies, for an ...


3

Sun-Earth distance: 1AU Earth-Jupiter distance (at the conjunction): 4AU So Lucifer will be four times farther than Sun when it is nearer (six times when it is farthest), and at the same time it is a thousand times smaller. This is approx 40 times more light than full moon concentrated in a tiny point on sky.


2

Although its too late to reply to this interesting question but trying to add few more points. Yes the sun rotates. Now the question arises as to how we can check that? We can observe this by observing sunspots. All sunspots move across the face of the Sun. This motion is part of the general rotation of the Sun on its axis. Observations also indicate that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included