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7

A succinct summary of supernova types is given in the following image based on Heger et al. (2003): Image courtesy of Wikipedia user Fulvio 314 under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. The graph is based on the graph in Fig. 1 of the linked paper. The pair instability realm is upwards of ~100 solar masses, though it is ...


3

To get time on the Hubble Space Telescope is a difficult, peer-reviewed process. The time is usually about ten times oversubscribed. The scientific justification to get more images must be more than "it would make a nice movie". The submission of proposals for HST time is a confidential process; so I don't know whether the principal investigators for these ...


1

In retrospect, we now know that the peak brightness was indeed 10.5 during the first week of February, 2014: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/observing-news/supernova-in-m82-passes-its-peak/


1

I guess it depends on the type of Supernovae. Type 1a supernovae are produced by a white dwarf star orbiting a companion close enough that matter transfers from the companion to the surface of the white dwarf. Assuming only your star system of a 3M star and 6M star, the 6M star would become a white dwarf star first. At the end of it's life, it would have ...


0

The factors that affect the shape of supernova remnants include: Interstellar medium (the gas and particles between stars) Planets that surrounded the star Magnetic field (in the same way magnetic fields cause auroras) Mass distribution of the star before supernova There are probably more, but that's all I can think of at the moment


2

Copper is not thought to be primarily made in a supernova. It is thought to be mainly produced by the s-process of slow neutron capture onto iron-peak nuclei that already exist inside a star. These reactions are endothermic. The source of the neutrons is still somewhat debated, it could either be from the decay of $^{13}$C in relatively low-mass asymptotic ...


2

Several satellites (but most notably Iridium) have large reflective panels. If aligned with the sun properly, it can shine with sufficient brightness to be visible in the daytime. An Iridium Flare usually lasts only a few seconds. It sounds quite consistent with your description. It can be hard to tell in a blue sky with no nearby references, but an ...



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