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With the wedge in place, you will only do polar alignments. If you want to go back to az/el, you must remove the wedge. For me polar alignments are much faster and easier than az/el alignments. For polar: level the mount Set your latitude on the wedge Let the auto alignment point the scope at dec 90 and manually spin the mount until you align on Polaris. ...


0

Much like Jeremy has answered, Mars will appear just larger than a point, you will be able to discern a disk, however with minimal detail. For an overview of the disk you will see, I two versions of a virtual telescope in Wolfram Mathemtica; one with an orange disk and another using models of the planets. Anyway, using the orange disk variant, I input the ...


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The PowerSeeker will come with a manual on collimation of the mirrors. As the light entering the telescope hits the primary lens, the light reflects and compresses onto the secondary mirror, in turn reflects and compresses the light onto the eyepiece. When the mirrors are misaligned, the light rays aren't correctly focused onto a point where they are ...


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Light pollution does not matter for the Moon. Even transparency doesn't matter that much. What does matter is seeing, a.k.a. air turbulence. It is very rare that an exit pupil smaller than 0.5 mm is useful for anything - perhaps for some tight double stars, but that's about it. So take that as a hard lower limit. In terms of a "soft" limit, it depends. If ...


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Since the magnification is determined by focal length of the objective/focal length of eyepiece it is difficult to have an eye-piece with the same f ratio as the objective. Assuming pupil aprature 0.25" then the ideal eye-piece aperature will be 0.25" for most effective light transmission of the eye.A generally acceptable f8 would have a focal length of ...


2

Telescopes will generally come with a library of objects, which includes information on where they are located on the celestial sphere. There are two important pieces of information needed for the telescope to be able to locate objects from your Earthly location - Your position so that it knows its orientation relative to the celestial sphere, and the time ...


2

First you have enter your coordinates into the mount's software and then align it(e.g. 3 star alignment).After having done that, when you finish the observation you have to park the telescope. Actually Colin's answer is really helpful.They keyphrase is "After installation set up". The whole procedure should be explained in your telescope's manual. If you ...


2

After installation set up,the coordinates Ra and Dec are locked in to the ra of GMT(0 astronomically) and installation latitude.These are input requirements of installation. From that point,an onboard clock remembers all points from that reference. It is not a sat-nav base unit and installation would have to be repeated if repositioned in another location.


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It is safe to observe anything during the day, as long as you don't point the telescope close to the Sun. Just stay away from the Sun and you'll be fine. Be careful to not accidentally swing the tube in the direction of the Sun. E.g. Mercury is pretty hard to observe at other times than during the day (or dusk), and yet astronomers have been observing it ...


1

I have found a good time to view the moon is before the sky is fully light,say 8am.The pupil of the eye will no be fully dilated and better eye/lens will give improved resolution(f ratio).In addition to this an improved contrast will be achieved as the atmosphere has less reflected light relative to the optical system of the telescope. A friend and I agreed ...


4

As long as you don't directly look at the sun through your telescope, then there is no problem. But don't try to see the moon during solar eclipse without special filters (easily available for your telescope's eyepieces) In my telescope, I have seen the moon day time when there was very light cloud cover. It was awesome scene. You can feel that the moon is ...


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There are many refractors/reflectors that can be obtained ready made and be more useful as the interest develops You would be wise to get the largest objective you can afford,although an interesting project kit it is minimal in aperture(ref: Galscope)


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Radio telescopes are frequently used to observe the births of stars and their planetary systems. The longer wavelengths are able to penetrate from beneath the envelope of gas and dust that shrouds any attempts to view these events at optical or infrared wavelengths. Unfortunately, the smallest angular resolution of a telescope goes as $\lambda/D$, where $D$ ...


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Some radio telescopes have been used to observe young stars and protoplanetary disks, if that counts. Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA): Though it's used for a variety of things, ALMA was used in late 2014 to observe a young star, HL Tau. Among the data gathered was information about HL Tau's circumstellar disk. It found a series of gaps in the disk. ...



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