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A few clarifications. Telescopes in general operate at very large distances - "at infinity" is the term used in optics parlance. A bright enough object can be seen from any distance, no matter what its size is. All that matters is that: It's bright enough to produce an impression on whatever sensor you're using (or your eye) The background is dark enough ...


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They're not different. Same principles do apply. You could have secondary, tertiary, quaternary, and so on, mirrors with instruments at any wavelength, either optical, or radio, or infrared, etc. You could also have instrumentation placed directly in prime focus (so no mirrors other than the primary) with any kind of instrument - radio or infrared or visible ...


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One of the reasons for the difference is the sheer number of different optical (and near-infrared) instruments available. Most professional optical telescopes have two or more standard instruments (e.g., an imager and a spectrograph), with the possibility of adding guest instruments from time to time; some have as many as five standard instruments at the ...


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It would appear to have been developed by Carl Pulfrich working for Zeiss in 1904. Alternatively Max Wolf in 1900 again working with the Zeiss company. Looks like the idea was Wolf's and the realisation Pulfrich's. From the second link we have: Wolf was a codeveloper of the stereo comparator together with Carl Pulfrich from the Zeiss company. The ...


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Radio telescopes are shaped differently primarily because we can't see microwaves or radio waves. Optical telescopes are designed so that there is a focal point where you can look and see the image. However, radio telescopes and optical telescopes actually work very similarly, and sometimes radio telescopes do have secondary reflectors. In an optical ...



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