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user3814836's answer seems to be right. However, the choice of the telescope depends on what you want. With a refractor telescope (I have one, a SkyWatcher BK 707AZ2). It's maybe a good start for a beginner, if you want to discover the brightest objects of the deep sky before going further. However, there is a defect: chromatic aberration. Also, you need ...


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If you are going to buy a telescope in the city let me suggest a large aperture and a reflective telescope. I live in a city as well and I use a reflector telescope. I did have trouble with some dimmer galaxies to start with but if you buy a light pollution filter you can see them a lot better. Also take a series of images of the same object and then ...


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If you're dead broke (like most people) I would suggest you take look at a small refractor telescope, you could pick up a cheap-o Celestron Powerseeker 60/70 for something like 40 bucks. The useability of such a small telescope is very limited, but you'll be able to get a nice clear image of the rings of Saturn, four of Jupiter's moons, or nice views of the ...


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Mount a camera on the tripod and take a long exposure. You should be able to determine the concentric circles of the stars paths. The center of the circle is the North pole.


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Yes, of course it will work. A Dobsonian is merely a Newtonian telescope on a special mount.


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Increasing the separation of the dishes makes the effective aperture of the array larger, so it increases the spatial resolution. However, the overall collection area of the aperture has not increased, so the signal-to-noise ratio will not increase.


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Physically there is nothing dictating the distances between dishes. These telescope arrays are interferometers. By combining the signal of the two dishes you can achieve a spacial resolution of a giant virtual dish that is about as large as the distance (called the baseline) between the two real telescopes. A nice example of the power of this technique ...


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Telescopes tend to have a fixed focal length. What changes is the size of the sensor in the instrument used. If a small sensor is used, then a smaller section of the field of view is exposed, resulting in a narrower field of view being imaged than the equipment is capable of. If a larger sensor is used, more of the field of view of the telescope is utilised. ...



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