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Fisheye lenses. Sure, it's doable. But does it really lead to "better" stargazing? It's debatable. The human field of vision is already pretty wide as it is. There are telescope eyepieces out there that operate on the principle of light amplification, and they do indeed raise the bar in terms of the faintest stars that can be seen in that telescope. They ...


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Unless you're really rich, unfortunately you won't be able to see all of them. Jupiter's fifth largest Moon, Amalthea, has an apparent magnitude of $m$ = 14.1. Comparing this to the magnitude of Europa, the dimmest of the Galilean moons, which is 5.3, tells us that Amalthea is roughly 3000 times less bright. Your telescope thus needs to have an area 3000 ...


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I'll start the bidding with the SuperWASP South telescope in South Africa. Built and operated by Keele University, it cost less than 400k GBP, and has discovered more transiting exoplanets (about 50 so far) in the southern hemisphere than any other effort. There are many refereed journal papers from the programme - a simple google on SuperWASP will find ...


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It's called gravitational lensing. Here's a link to the wikipedia article on the subject: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_lens. Gravity affects everything, including light. A massive object such as a star, a galaxy, or in this case, a cluster of galaxies, bends the path of photons that pass very close to the massive object. Bending light is the ...


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Whether you'll be able to see them depends on the levels of light pollution in your area. As TildalWave mentioned, a number nebulae and galaxies are perfectly observable with the naked eye so unless you live somewhere very bright, you should be fine. Under really dark skies, objects like M31 are very easy to find with the naked eye. Where I live, I hardly ...


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You can see some of them with a naked eye. Many of the Messier objects, including galaxies and nebulae are observable even without any telescopes. As for others, if Charles Messier could catalog them in 1771 with a 4 inch refractor, you should see most using your 3.3 inch reflector too given good observation conditions, knowing where to point and using a ...



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