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12s
revised What effect does the Moon have on the near Earth asteroid population?
added 229 characters in body
7m
asked What effect does the Moon have on the near Earth asteroid population?
1d
answered Can black holes collide with the Sun? In that case what will happen?
2d
comment Are there other universes?
I think the problem with that kind of cosmological philosophy is all about the concept of likelihood. We exist, it is not a likelihood, it is a certainty. Probability is a mist in human minds, I suspect this is so also in advanced physics, understanding it well only mathematically, but not really in physical reality. Changing the decimals of some fine tuned constant is maybe completely futile. Sure, measured numbers can be changed in terms of us editing them in our calculators and simulate what would happen. But what would the probability distribution of the cosmological constants be?
Feb
10
comment Are we so sure global warming is a result of humans burning fossil fuels?
@userLTK Well, the temperature hasn't risen at all since the 1990s, has it? Just to point out one little "flaw". Cosmologists are none the wiser, but at least they refrain from proposing, or letting themselves be used as a political excuse for, proposed political reforms to abolish industry.
Feb
9
revised What planet is better than earth to infer solar system configuration?
added 24 characters in body
Feb
9
answered What planet is better than earth to infer solar system configuration?
Feb
9
comment Why does mass naturally move closer toward's the center of other masses?
That's the big question of physics! Relativity says that space is curved and everyone of course know from personal experience that stuff obviously fall down slopes... But it is not true that masses move closer to each other. For example, the Moon is spiraling away from Earth.
Feb
9
comment Are we so sure global warming is a result of humans burning fossil fuels?
The effect of the Sun which is seriously discussed is not the insolation, but Solar activities' effect on Earth's magnetic field and hence on the amount of cosmic radiation that reaches the atmosphere and initiate cloud formation.
Feb
9
comment Are we so sure global warming is a result of humans burning fossil fuels?
@userLTK Climate scientists need to protest against being used as argument for political purposes. Unfortunately, such behavior is punished by the politicians who use the tax money they've robbed as a threat and a bribe. Increased CO2 in itself is extremely good for wildlife and agriculture. How fit climate science is as foundation for economic policy, you can judge yourself by looking at how well the global temperature prognoses made 20 years ago turned out compared with reality.
Feb
8
comment Are we so sure global warming is a result of humans burning fossil fuels?
@userLTK Climate researchers and politicians have themselves to blame for lacking credibility. They never distance themselves from the fanatic environmentalists who openly claim that "too many humans are alive"! A climate researcher who does not emphatically distance him/herself from environmentalists and from their anti-scientific genocidal economic politics, is of course automatically taken as one of them. Politicians use the propaganda trick to hide behind "science" when they brutally stop all criticism against or debate about their catastrophic economic policies.
Feb
8
comment Are we so sure global warming is a result of humans burning fossil fuels?
What is not sure (to say the least) is if the political statement that the best thing to do about it is to abolish most industry, transport, electricity and agriculture and hence kill billions of human beings, abolish all space programs and generally return to the medieval ages. Maybe adapting to a slowly increasing temperature would be very much better option? Especially since we always have done that most successfully and climate could change naturally too anyway.
Feb
4
comment What is spacetime 'made' of?
I thought that the current dogma was that everything is made out of something else. Kicking the can down the road.
Feb
3
comment Astronomy Jokes
In space, no one can hear you laugh. @barrycarter That list should be sent as a SETI-message to the aliens. If they don't have a sense of humor, then we better ignore them anyway.
Feb
3
comment Astronomy Jokes
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is socially entertaining but off topic and off-purpose of this forum.
Feb
3
comment Astronomy Jokes
The IAU. There are more jokes about astronomers than about astronomy.
Feb
3
comment Could an impact have resurfaced Venus 300 million years ago?
@userLTK So Venus has more heavy hydrogen because the lighter isotope has been stripped off by the solar wind. That's a great argument. But! Couldn't it already have been stripped off of a large comet which orbited near Venus and the Sun during billions of years before the impact?
Feb
3
comment Why do planets tend to rotate in the same direction although they have formed from tumbling asteroids?
That would be the most sane explanation, but still quite short. How does the rotation of the Solar nebula systematically affect each and every individual planet which is formed in it in the same way? Shouldn't half of the planets have been impacted in a way that tipped them over?
Feb
3
comment Why do planets tend to rotate in the same direction although they have formed from tumbling asteroids?
But the law of large numbers adds up to an average. Throwing planets like dice would add up to no planet rotation at all on average. Isn't it strange that the dice shows an even number of dots almost all of the time? If the rotation of the nebula affects the rotation of each planet, but not that of the asteroids, then I need more explanation to understand how that is so. Is there any relationship between the rotation of the Solar nebula, and the rotation of the individual planets formed within it?
Feb
3
comment Why do planets tend to rotate in the same direction although they have formed from tumbling asteroids?
I suppose that orbital inclination should be considered in addition to axial tilt.