338 reputation
6
bio website stevenvh.net/steven.php
location Flanders, Belgium
age 54
visits member for 7 months
seen Feb 26 at 10:04

That's "Steven" (with the "n" at the end)


"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." — Bertrand Russell


Product designer, consumer electronics: audio (with Philips), home automation.
Done computer science in a previous life too.


Belbin team roles: Plant and Resource Investigator


Personal values: respect, honesty, pride, modesty, fairness


I yell because I care


favorite candy


Feb
24
awarded  Quorum
Feb
24
revised Is the light we see from stars extremely old?
added 550 characters in body
Feb
23
comment Age of the universe
"It looks improbable..." sounds subjective at least. Why do you think it's improbable?
Feb
18
answered regarding curvature of earth
Feb
18
comment Why do objects burn when they enter earth's atmosphere?
@RhysW - I didn't make this up; I definitely have heard this elsewhere, otherwise I wouldn't post it. I found this video, which doesn't refer to the pressure per se, but talks about meteorites exploding above ground, like Tunguska. I'm also thinking about the meteorite above Russia last year. I think these can be explained easier by the pressure hypothesis than pure friction. Also see my edit on the Columbia shuttle, where speed (and pressure) were much lower than those of a meteorite. I'll try to find more material.
Feb
18
comment Why do objects burn when they enter earth's atmosphere?
@RhysW - 'fraid not. This is knowledge I collected over several decades through several sources, including courses. I read in meta that there seems to be a need for references for some people, but I disagree (as I pointed out there).
Feb
17
revised Why do objects burn when they enter earth's atmosphere?
added 521 characters in body
Feb
17
awarded  Supporter
Feb
17
awarded  Critic
Feb
17
answered Is the light we see from stars extremely old?
Feb
17
comment Why do objects burn when they enter earth's atmosphere?
@A.K - Right. Comets move at speeds of hundreds of kilometers per second without having any medium in which they would heat up. Note that comets may evaporate very slowly due to the sun's radiation though, but this is nothing mechanical.
Feb
17
awarded  Editor
Feb
17
revised Can redshift be measured using fourier?
included image
Feb
17
suggested suggested edit on Can redshift be measured using fourier?
Feb
17
answered if the big bang only expanded the universe when and how did it originate?
Feb
17
answered Why do objects burn when they enter earth's atmosphere?
Feb
17
comment Did atoms in human body indeed come from stars?
As a side note on Neil deGrasse Tyson (NDT): he's a great speaker, and you might be interested in his talk for the SciCafe: youtube.com/watch?v=4KRZQQ_eICo
Feb
17
comment Did atoms in human body indeed come from stars?
@user1880405 - Yes, but as I tried to explain the planets are formed from the debris of exploded stars. Larger masses form stars, and the stars attract other debris, which either is absorbed or ends up in orbits. Planets in turn attract more space stuff. We're lucky to have the giant Jupiter to be a spatial "vacuum cleaner" which attracts many meteorites and other stuff which otherwise would end up on the earth. But all in all it's all traceable to exploding stars.
Feb
17
comment Did atoms in human body indeed come from stars?
@user1880405 - Gerald describes radioactive atoms, which decay to slightly different ones. In that case the atoms aren't exactly the ones which originated in stars. But most atoms made in stars are stable, i.e. not radioactive. But even radioactive atoms don't completely disappear to form completely new atoms; you could say that for instance they retain 90 of their 91 neutrons, while the remaining decays into a proton. All within the same atom.
Feb
17
answered Do black holes die?