402 reputation
8
bio website stevenvh.net/steven.php
location Flanders, Belgium
age 54
visits member for 7 months
seen 9 hours ago

That's "Steven" (with the "n" at the end)


"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." — Bertrand Russell


Product designer, consumer electronics: audio (with Philips), home automation.
Done computer science in a previous life too.


Belbin team roles: Plant and Resource Investigator


Personal values: respect, honesty, pride, modesty, fairness


I yell because I care


favorite candy


9h
comment What causes jets from newly born stars?
No, I didn't find this on Wikipedia, but other sources don't offer a good explanation either. Thanks for your answer.
1d
answered Milky way: How do we know its appearance?
1d
asked What causes jets from newly born stars?
Sep
22
comment Is there matter forming in the inflationary space?
@Wayfaring - Well, the Steady State Model may have had some supporters in its time, but it was definitely discredited with the discovery of the CMB in 1965. I'm a bit surprised someone still wants to talk about it :-).
Sep
19
comment How certain are we about the universe's flatness?
What I meant was: can we account the 1% as completely observational error, or are there voices for a curved universe, when we can reduce the error? Suppose we now see +1/-1 %, but in the future +1/-0.5 % and even further in the future +1/-0.2 %. Doesn't this hint to a curved universe, when looked at at larger scales (than we can observe)?
Sep
19
revised Is there matter forming in the inflationary space?
added 321 characters in body
Sep
19
revised Is there matter forming in the inflationary space?
added 321 characters in body
Sep
19
revised Is there matter forming in the inflationary space?
added 172 characters in body
Sep
19
answered Is there matter forming in the inflationary space?
Sep
19
asked How certain are we about the universe's flatness?
Sep
19
comment How can light reach us from 14 billion light years away?
That's a hypothetical number you're using as an example. The expansion occurs at escape velocity, and that's lower than $c$. The explanation comes from the inflation epoch.
Sep
19
comment How can light reach us from 14 billion light years away?
@Scottie - No. The study of the universe is cosmology. Astronomy is the study of the life of stars, which is a much smaller field. Astronomy doesn't include the Big Bang, the CMB or the formation of early galaxies, for instance.
Sep
18
asked Free neutrons and stellar nucleosynthesis
Sep
18
awarded  Student
Sep
17
comment How fast is a comet moving when it crosses Earth's orbit?
It depends. An object's speed is related to the length of it's orbit, and this varies greatly. See Kepler's Laws.
Sep
17
comment Milky Way Formation
Could you summarize it here? If the video is ever removed your answer becomes useless.
Sep
17
awarded  Commentator
Sep
17
comment Did cosmological inflation occur at speeds greater than $c$?
@HDE226868 - (Disclaimer: I'm an engineer, not a cosmologist) However, I don't agree: If the radiation started 13.7By ago and reaches us now, and traveled at light speed, then it must have been 13.7Bly away when it started! Speed x time = distance. 1 light year/year (speed) x 13.7 billion years (time) = 13.7 billion light years (distance)
Sep
17
comment Did cosmological inflation occur at speeds greater than $c$?
@HDE226868 - But the radiation we now see from the CMB did start 13.7By ago, doesn't it? In the CMB we see the universe as it was that long ago, and the light/radiation traveled 13.7Bly before it reaches us at this moment, right? I agree with Joan that it's around us (otherwise we wouldn't detect it), but my point is that what we see comes from 13.7Bly away. Agree?
Sep
17
comment Did cosmological inflation occur at speeds greater than $c$?
@Joan.bdm - But the CMB is the remains of the opacity wall at 60(?)ky after the big bang, isn't it? And since the BB occurred 13.7By ago, that light has traveled 13.7Bly, right? What am I doing wrong? Thanks for your reply, though.