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location Germany
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visits member for 8 months
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Currently working on my Master thesis in exoplanetary atmospheres. Aaaahhh the beauty of wibbly-wobbly fluids!


Nov
6
comment Climate modeling of exoplanets
Judging from your accepted answer: Are you only interested in terrestial planets, or also Exo-Jupiters / Exo-Nepunes?
Oct
30
awarded  Student
Oct
30
asked Energetics of Titans Tholin haze
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
14
comment Conditions on Hot Jupiters
Cool. I'll add some refs and perhaps pics tomorrow, cuz I'm too lazy to search for the papers now ;)
Sep
14
answered Conditions on Hot Jupiters
Aug
9
awarded  Commentator
Aug
9
comment Birth and Evolution of Millisecond Pulsars
Perhaps add the $\dot P-P$ diagram, to be able to visually track the evolution of a MS-pulsar.
Jun
13
comment What is the difference between gas and dust in astronomy?
Ofc in cosmology all matter is simply referred to as "dust" and assumed not to move at all. So one has to look at the subsection of astronomy on is dealing with.
May
29
awarded  Supporter
May
27
comment What study profiles could land me the job of Astronomer?
@LocalFluff Depends. If you wanna go Astronomy - you observe and process data. Ofc physics to interpret the data is needed. If you go Astrophysics then again it depends. Planetary sciences would be useful for exoplanets, but if you're interested in cosmology/galaxies/cluster dynamics etc. you won't need that.
May
26
comment Did we ever actually see the earth revolving around the sun? Is the geocentric model completely disproved?
With 'you' I meant 'one'. Sometimes ppl talk like this in science. Centrifugal force is as real as any term in a equation of motion and must be taken into account when one wants to reach its goal in real space. If one ignores a term, the spacecraft won't reach its destination. When the model matches reality everything works out nicely.
May
26
comment Did we ever actually see the earth revolving around the sun? Is the geocentric model completely disproved?
Cosmic rays up until certain energies affecting the electronics are isotropic. No planetary shadow would therefore cause regular shutdowns, but those with random pattern. When our Mars / Venus probes vanish behind the sun together with the planet, this happens on a regular pattern basis. And no, I doesn't make the calculations more complex but plainly wrong, as you ignore the centrifugal force.
May
26
comment Did we ever actually see the earth revolving around the sun? Is the geocentric model completely disproved?
Communication cutoffs wouldn't happen according to the geocentric system. And the simple fact that we put them there using heliocentric calculations.
May
26
answered Did we ever actually see the earth revolving around the sun? Is the geocentric model completely disproved?
May
24
comment Metallicity of Celestial Objects: Why “Metal = Non-metal”?
@Cheeku: I wasn't hitting on that, I was hitting on the myth that we don't care about metals in astrophysics&astronomy.
May
24
comment Metallicity of Celestial Objects: Why “Metal = Non-metal”?
Actually we do give a lot of 'crap' about those other elements and metals. Even in those days when solar physics was born, there was quite some interest in the chemical composition of stars. I'd still think the naming came for rather simplifying reasons.
May
19
answered Broadband spectrum of Sun
May
19
comment How did astronomers first come to understand that the Sun's core was a gas?
I mean, we could elaborate a bit more on the arguments why ppl excluded that the sun's energy source can't be coal burning. Then, with discovering of the atomic nucleus, and measurments of binding energy per nucleus per element ppl got the idea of a fusioning gas around ~1930's I think, rather fast. Plus the neutrinos were pointing at nuclear reactions. But glad that I could help.
May
18
comment How did astronomers first come to understand that the Sun's core was a gas?
Actually, I don't know. I know for sure that since the works of Bunsen and MKirchhoff in the late 1800s it was certain that the sun's surface is a gas (forgot to add that). And also from Kirchhoffs laws of spectroscopy ppl had a first idea about the thermal structure of this surface gases. But I'm not sure how far down into the star they did extrapolate this. I think more important here are energetic arguments: How should a solid core produce all this energy we see? (assuming this happens in the core)