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  • 11 votes cast
Jul
2
answered Accidental or deliberate?
Jun
10
comment For how many bodies can there be a stable orbit with no very heavy central body?
Stability would need a mathematical proof, which we can already do for the 3-body-problem only in special cases. For arbitrary N-body that's impossible.
Apr
12
comment Is the sun too small to self-ignite?
One could add maybe the mention of the Gamow Peak, nu.phys.laurentian.ca/~fleurot/fusionrate which quantifies the statements made above. Also Deuterium burning already happens in Giant Planets / Brown dwarves that are less massive than the sun.
Mar
28
comment How can you determine the initial volume of a planet's atmosphere?
Also if you want a initial atmosphere, its link with the protosolar nebula is continuous, maybe separated by an accretion shock onto the planet. There you could define the volume, but in later eras it doesn't make sense to talk about the volume. @td-lambda: Why are you interested in that? If you're really about initial conditions then why not rather define surface pressure and temperature?
Mar
27
comment How did water get on Earth
@pela: I think we can leave it be, as a little discussion is sometimes illuminating, as in this case too.
Mar
27
answered How did water get on Earth
Mar
27
comment How did water get on Earth
This number of 1/6 you're citing is only valid if the whole atmosphere has the temperature. In case of a hot plume of this temperature launched in the troposphere, this will be easily trapped in the lower atmosphere, and can maybe wirl up dust higher up, like we know it from volcanic eruptions. However like @Rob-Jeffries said, it's important how fast the plume cools.
Mar
26
answered Do we still use the term “astronomical unit” nowadays?
Mar
24
comment Dynamic Method-Please explain
Do you mean perturbations of heavier objects (e.e. gas giants) that have known masses?
Mar
19
comment Why did Venus not lose its atmosphere without magnetic field?
@MacUserT: Mars' atmosphere has the same 'heavy gasses' as Venus does - $CO_2$ up to a dominant degree. Therefore the atmospheric composition cannot make the difference, as there is none.
Mar
10
awarded  Yearling
Feb
17
awarded  Critic
Feb
11
comment What astronomical observations would give conclusive proof of alien life?
Hot topic perhaps, but certainly one of the least scientificly conducted ones.
Feb
7
comment How do moons get captured?
But usually you simply need another fourth body, or a mass of bodies, that number 3 can throw out to loose angular momentum. This at least is alot more probable/efficient in a your solar system, than the mentioned mechanisms.
Dec
12
comment Energetics of Titans Tholin haze
I would consider it useful.
Dec
12
comment Energetics of Titans Tholin haze
Ah okay. Well, it was part of the puzzle so I for sure didn't consider it useless in any way. It's nowhere written that one single answer must contain all we know about the question, and I hope stackexchange never will be this uselessly strict. Also you apparently did some work for that, so I was just about to upvote when it got deleted.
Dec
11
comment Energetics of Titans Tholin haze
Sorry Mods? Who deleted @Sabre Tooth 's answer and why?
Dec
11
comment Energetics of Titans Tholin haze
Ok, but as you said this is only half the truth. Do we know how important in energy trapping the tholins are except from the obvious, optical range?
Dec
11
comment Energetics of Titans Tholin haze
Ok, so basically you're saying / quoting that Tholins to first order may be a by-product of the formation of a stratosphere, right?
Dec
4
comment How can astronomers determine the difference between “hydrostatic equilibruim” and “just happens to be spherical”?
Also thermal history. A body that is now 'solid' over certain timescales was surely pretty fluid at the time of its formation. After cooling it stayed the way it formed - spherical.