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seen Oct 18 at 2:51

Application security specialist and developer, focusing on efficient designs and model-driven architecture. Pro tem moderator on Space Exploration Stack Exchange, a beta Q&A site for spacecraft operators, scientists, engineers, and enthusiasts.

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    Space Exploration


Oct
14
reviewed No Action Needed Mapping selenographic coordinates onto a sphere
Oct
14
comment Time dilation at the Big Bang
Are you perchance alluding to the recently published book by Louise Riofrio titled “The Speed of Light” in which she presents her $GM=tc^3$ theory? It was also discussed by its author in September 7 edition of The Space Show, if that helps. Show is archived and you can listen to it via this link (MP3). Some of what you wrote in your question reminded me of that so perhaps you'll find it relevant / interesting. Cheers!
Oct
13
comment Time dilation at the Big Bang
BTW I voted to close as "unclear what you're asking" because I could use a clarification to better understand the question and am not exactly sure my previous comment hits the spot. I kinda hate how the system displays like I marked it as a duplicate too, just because others did so before me. I mean, how can I be sure that it is a duplicate if I'm not even exactly sure what the question is? :O
Oct
13
reviewed Close Time dilation at the Big Bang
Oct
13
comment Time dilation at the Big Bang
I think you're confusing time dilation with propagation (speed) of light through a medium, which was indeed too dense for light to even propagate during the dark ages. There was no time dilation on the universal scale and in its true meaning simply because there's no wider frame of reference to observe it in than the one you'd like to apply it to. But if you're asking if time run faster or slower at differently dense parts of it, then sure, it does that still. But that's nothing special to early universe, it's "just" gravity. Not that we really know what it is, but that's what it does. Q.E.D.
Oct
13
awarded  Enlightened
Oct
13
reviewed Close Venus started with retrograde rotation?
Oct
13
comment Venus started with retrograde rotation?
It's a bit unclear if you're asking about retrograde orbit (i.e. it completes a year clockwise around the Sun) or retrograde rotation of the planet along its own axis w.r.t. its orbit (completes a day clockwise)? A link to where you heard what you allude to in your question could help, please edit the question with additional details explaining what precisely are you asking. On top of the question that this one is suggested as a possible duplicate of, also see Why do (most of) the planets rotate counterclockwise, i.e. the same way the Sun does?
Oct
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
9
awarded  Outspoken
Oct
5
reviewed Satisfactory How many light years away is Earth from the closest outer edge of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way?
Oct
5
reviewed Needs Improvement Time after sunset until star can be seen
Oct
5
reviewed Needs Improvement What is CMB radiation doing to the universe?
Oct
5
reviewed Satisfactory Why aren't there galaxy-sized balls of iron out there?
Oct
5
reviewed Satisfactory Original Hubble diagram units incorrect?
Oct
5
reviewed Satisfactory Which spiral arm of the Milky Way is Kepler-62 in?
Oct
5
reviewed Needs Improvement Is there a paper on galaxy mergers in clusters of galaxies?
Oct
5
reviewed Satisfactory Data for red-shifting
Oct
5
reviewed Satisfactory Name of area close to Local Bubble?
Oct
5
reviewed Needs Improvement Weight of a celestial body