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bio website twitter.com/tildalwave
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visits member for 9 months
seen Jul 3 at 20:09

Application security specialist and developer, focusing on efficient designs and model-driven architecture. Pro tem moderator on Space Exploration Stack Exchange, a beta Q&A site for spacecraft operators, scientists, engineers, and enthusiasts.

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'nuff said!

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    Space Exploration


Jun
22
comment What is a graviton?
Nothing, if it's acceptable on Physics and not a duplicate, moderators will migrate it there for you. It's just about putting things in their designated boxes, OCD, ermmm... Stack Exchange style. ;)
Jun
22
reviewed Close What is a graviton?
Jun
22
comment What is a graviton?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about particle physics and would be better asked on Physics.
Jun
22
comment Parking a telescope at a Lagrange point: is this a good idea from a debris point of view?
@this BTW if you want to nitpick about Sun-Earth L-point stability (exists only in Wikipedia, not in real space), then perhaps a better point would be that relative velocities of theoretically stable object in their orbit would be small, which means smaller kinetic potential on impact, which means "safer" for a spacecraft stationkeeping there.
Jun
22
comment Parking a telescope at a Lagrange point: is this a good idea from a debris point of view?
@this It's not related to the question being asked and no, they're not really "stable", not for Sun-Earth points at least, because of gravitational perturbations of Jupiter. Otherwise the Earth would have stable Trojan and Hilda asteroids close to them, and it doesn't (one in tadpole and one in horseshoe orbit don't really count as that). There's also disputable higher concentration of interplanetary dust at L4 & L5, that some claim have detected by telescopes, but STEREO spacecraft failed to confirm when they passed the region. And L1 - L3 are saddle points. Question is about L2 halo orbit!
Jun
22
revised Parking a telescope at a Lagrange point: is this a good idea from a debris point of view?
added 202 characters in body
Jun
22
comment Aren't the mirrors of the James Webb Space Telescope too unprotected?
Related: Parking a telescope at a Lagrange point: is this a good idea from a debris point of view?
Jun
22
reviewed Reviewed Aren't the mirrors of the James Webb Space Telescope too unprotected?
Jun
22
comment Aren't the mirrors of the James Webb Space Telescope too unprotected?
This would likely be a better fit on Space Exploration, since it's more about operational requirements, design and risk management procedures of the spacecraft in a specific Earth-centric orbit (SEL2), than the astronomy science it'll be performing. However please don't cross-post, let's first see if Astronomy community agrees that it's off-topic.
Jun
21
comment How many new galaxies enter the observable universe each day/year/decade?
You probably mean how many galaxies? Still, the observable universe horizon isn't limited by the age of the Universe, but its inflation. Number of observable galaxies is actually getting smaller, not larger. And the rate of change would not be linear with time either.
Jun
21
reviewed Leave Open One year on the sun
Jun
21
reviewed Close Any cheap (less than 100 euro) telescope for observing Jupiter?
Jun
21
reviewed Looks OK Escaping a black hole
Jun
12
comment How many planets do on average different star types support?
I'm not sure your question makes much sense. For one, you're mixing several stellar classifications (e.g. by mass, by spectral type, by stellar dynamics, by their evolutionary stage,...) in your selection. And I don't recognize some, is "Super Red" supposed to be a red giant? And how is "Protostar" a star? The rest will also be difficult to answer with statistics (min, max, average), since we're barely scratching the surface, so to speak, with exoplanetary census. BTW minimum will always be 0. ;)
Jun
8
comment Does the Moon Have Enough Water for Robert Zubrin's Mars settlement Plan To Work?
@LocalFluff OK, no need to convince me of an alternative possible answer. I wrote mine based on information that I had and what seemed to make the most sense to me. You seem to have different information and ideas about feasibility, so please write another answer. The more, the merrier. I'm not married to what option I suggested here. ;)
Jun
8
comment Does the Moon Have Enough Water for Robert Zubrin's Mars settlement Plan To Work?
Ah yes, here it is; a bit more detailed info on that in Wikipedia article on the Moon: Seasons. It mentions ... four mountainous regions on the rim of Peary crater at the Moon's north pole.
Jun
8
comment Does the Moon Have Enough Water for Robert Zubrin's Mars settlement Plan To Work?
@LocalFluff The Moon does have a slight axial tilt too, so those regions of permanent sunlight would be rare and far between. IIRC only a handful of peaks at the lunar North pole around a single crater qualify, and none at the South pole as far as we know. So yes, what you say is possible, assuming that single larger crater holds sufficient water ice reserves. You'd be dealing with huge temperature differential though, and require several relay satellites in lunar polar orbit, if comms with the Earth are needed. All this might be a lot simpler to do at lunar equator IMO. But post a new answer.
Jun
4
reviewed Close Why one cannot escape from a black hole
Jun
4
reviewed Close What study profiles could land me the job of Astronomer?
Jun
4
reviewed No Action Needed Orbital Elements Transformations