Reputation
1,401
Top tag
Next privilege 1,500 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
2 19
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~19k people reached

May
26
reviewed Close “Up” and “down” in Space
May
26
reviewed Leave Open Can the Milky Way be seen with the naked eye? Does this apply to any galaxy? If yes, then how and when?
May
26
reviewed Approve Can the Milky Way be seen with the naked eye? Does this apply to any galaxy? If yes, then how and when?
May
24
comment Longest and shortest wavelength
And ultra violet light get shifted into the visible light: 1225 nm -> 700 nm.
May
24
comment How would time travel work with a man made wormhole, with one side of it sent on a rocket at light speed and then returned to Earth?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is theoretical and opinionated.
May
23
revised Types of Exoplanets
Added spaces for readability
May
23
comment Why aren't secondary mirrors offset to get rid of diffraction spikes due to the support vanes?
It's easy enough to visualize the shape of the mirror. Take a mirror designed for a telescope and take a slice of 1/6 of it. From this section, trim the corners until you have an oval mirror. Now that we have computer control of the grinding, it is possible to make the mirror. Before computer control, it would have been nearly impossible to get the correct shape for the mirror.
May
17
comment Evidence that galaxies are made of billions of stars?
@RobJeffries Are you saying that our sun is producing significant quantities of heavy elements (heavier than iron)? (Are you saying carbon is a heavy element?) Also, from what I read, when our sun dies, it will expel the outer hydrogen layer and most of the core will be compressed into a neutron star. I don't see how this will enrich the ISM with heavy elements (although it will redistribute the dust in the ISM).
May
17
comment Evidence that galaxies are made of billions of stars?
@RobJeffries Heavy elements indicate that there was a super nova (or several) explosions. They do not indicate that stars are currently present. (But it would change our current belief if only heavy stars made up a galaxy and have all exploded so there are no stars in that galaxy currently. Even the most distant galaxies appear to have the full range of stellar types.)
May
17
revised Evidence that galaxies are made of billions of stars?
Corrected word
May
17
revised Evidence that galaxies are made of billions of stars?
correction
May
15
answered Which is more rare: Lunar eclipse or Solar eclipse?
May
8
reviewed Approve How to plot orbit of binary star and calculate its orbital elements?
May
3
comment On a log-log plot of surface gravity to planet mass, what is the meaning of the y-intercept?
I've looked at the original data and noticed that you have only plotted gas giants (like Jupiter). It now makes more sense that a gaseous planet the mass of Earth (which would not exist due to the velocity of gases; the gases would just dissipate) would have the surface gravity about 100 times less than on Earth. Also, rocky planets increase in surface gravity as they get smaller so the value for Earth (2.998) is in the middle of the data.
May
3
comment On a log-log plot of surface gravity to planet mass, what is the meaning of the y-intercept?
You're right. I guess I should have double checked my calculation. So, the surface gravity of a planet with $log (M_O)=0$ is $log(a)=0.8631$, or $a=7.3cm/s^2$. Are you sure you have the right units? Since $9.98m/s^2=998cm/s^2$ and $log(998cm/s^2)=2.999$.
May
3
comment On a log-log plot of surface gravity to planet mass, what is the meaning of the y-intercept?
BTW, where did the data come from?
May
3
comment On a log-log plot of surface gravity to planet mass, what is the meaning of the y-intercept?
Considering the values for your plot, I would think that the error with determining the slope and the lack of points between 0.5 and 2 Earth masses is responsible for the large deviation of an object with almost no mass having a significant surface gravity. It would be best to plot the surface gravity for objects between 0.5 and 2 Earth masses to see if there is a statistical error.
May
2
comment What is the most populated/numerous stellar system in which the orbits of all objects are known?
Do you just want the star's orbits in a multiple star system, or are you looking for the planets' orbits?
Apr
29
reviewed Close Moment of falling in Black Hole if it can evaporate
Apr
29
reviewed Close Space time and aging