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Mar
9
awarded  Student
Mar
6
awarded  Scholar
Mar
6
accepted What's this red stuff in some astronomical photos, e.g. Centaurus A?
Mar
6
comment What's this red stuff in some astronomical photos, e.g. Centaurus A?
So this red color is not our ~650nm red, but a representation of an infrared light caused by warm dust. Right? What could be origin of dust in such shape? A nova?
Mar
6
awarded  Supporter
Mar
6
asked What's this red stuff in some astronomical photos, e.g. Centaurus A?
Apr
23
revised Putting mass-luminosity relation and Hertzsprung-Russel diagrams together leads us to a mass-age relation; so how do stars lose their mass over time?
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Apr
23
comment Putting mass-luminosity relation and Hertzsprung-Russel diagrams together leads us to a mass-age relation; so how do stars lose their mass over time?
Hi again. I'm sorry but I'm not satisfied. The sun must lose 8.66 e29 kg during upcoming 9 e10 years (see my last comment). But in the Solar Wind page of Wikipedia, I've found this: "the total mass loss each year is about (2ā€“3)×10 eāˆ’14 solar masses" which means only 5.35 e27 kg during this time (considering 3 e-14 solar masses each year). This amount of mass is less than 0.7% of total mass loss. What's wrong? My estimation? Or the Wikipedia data? Or maybe these are right, and there's some else mass ejection way for stars?
Apr
23
comment Putting mass-luminosity relation and Hertzsprung-Russel diagrams together leads us to a mass-age relation; so how do stars lose their mass over time?
Thanks for the answer. I think that transformation of mass into energy does not play a big role, as you said. I tried to estimate: Regarding to HS-diagram and mass-luminosity, the sun must lose 8.66 e29 kg of it's mass during upcoming 9 e10 years, but if the sun keeps radiating energy with current rate (in fact this rate will decrease by time, but we ignored that) the sun will lose only 1.22 e28 kg during this time (E=mc^2). This is less than 1.5% of all lost mass. Therefore, stellar winds are the main cause of mass loss. However I'm still looking for more answers and ideas.
Apr
23
asked Putting mass-luminosity relation and Hertzsprung-Russel diagrams together leads us to a mass-age relation; so how do stars lose their mass over time?