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visits member for 7 months
seen Nov 9 at 3:26
$me = array('master thief', 'world traveler', 'lover of women');

foreach($me as $quality) {
    echo 'I eat a lot of bologna.';
}

echo phpasm('

section .text
global  _huh

_huh:

mov     edx,en
mov     ecx,fudge
mov     ebx,1
mov     eax,4
int     0x80
mov     eax,1
int     0x80

section .data
fudge       db \'gonna steal some cold fusion notes\'
len     equ $ - fudge');

Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
12
accepted If Mars orbited the Earth how distant would it have to be to cause the same tides?
Jun
5
comment If Mars orbited the Earth how distant would it have to be to cause the same tides?
Sorry, I did mean oceanic tides, I fixed it. I'm not trying to solve for anything in particular, just my own curiosity.
Jun
5
awarded  Editor
Jun
5
revised If Mars orbited the Earth how distant would it have to be to cause the same tides?
tides clarificaiton
Jun
5
asked If Mars orbited the Earth how distant would it have to be to cause the same tides?
May
30
awarded  Supporter
May
30
comment Blowing up an asteroid/comet really potentially worse?
I didn't ask the proper way to avoid an asteroid impact, I specifically asked whether or not spreading it out would actually lessen the impact because it would be in smaller pieces allowing more to burn up, if the answer is "no" on the basis that one isn't accounting for the fact the Earth has an atmosphere, then it's not what I'm asking about.
May
30
comment Blowing up an asteroid/comet really potentially worse?
"So imagine you blow up a 10 km asteroid and you end up with multiple 600 m pieces of rock rushing towards Earth, then you just made the problem worse." Doesn't that presume though that none of these would burn up in the atmosphere more so than one solid piece? You may have 600 m smaller objects, but if it's 10km wide anyway, I don't see how you could make it worse.
May
29
awarded  Scholar
May
29
awarded  Student
May
29
asked Blowing up an asteroid/comet really potentially worse?
Apr
30
accepted What is visible light colour output of different stars?
Apr
30
comment What is visible light colour output of different stars?
I see, I have noticed that in the past. I've often wondered why photographs taken indoors in the 70s and 80s appear to be more yellow. This whole question came up due to the film "Pitch Black," not hard scifi, but the film is on a planet in a trinary star system; everything has a blue hue until the blue sun sets, then the other two suns (like ours) make everything look suspiciously like the Australian outback. So I wondered if this would actually be how it would be experienced.
Apr
30
comment What is visible light colour output of different stars?
Is this the case with our stars as well, are we just used to the tones of colours? I've never really noticed much of a difference in the colour of an object when outside versus inside with a white light bulb.
Apr
30
comment What is visible light colour output of different stars?
Thank you for the detailed explanation on how the stars would look, but I was actually wanting to know how all other objects would look in the light of the star. For example if I'm in a room lit by black lights, everything has a purple tone. I was wanting to know the correspondence between star type and available visible colours on objects.
Apr
29
asked What is visible light colour output of different stars?
Apr
23
accepted Why is Mars considered the outer edge of the “goldilocks zone”?
Apr
22
asked Why is Mars considered the outer edge of the “goldilocks zone”?