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location Amsterdam, the Netherlands
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9h
comment Is a spotting scope or binoculars a better choice for astronomy?
That is off topic as "these are very time and opinion specific and are likely to incite debate".
1d
comment Is a spotting scope or binoculars a better choice for astronomy?
I certainly don´t want to push you towards a telescope, but your requirements certainly don´t exclude telescopes. For example the Sky-Watcher Heritage-130P FlexTube Dobsonian is a scope which has received great reviews, weights 6 kg, has an aperture of 130mm, and it size is (h,l,w) 45 x 29 x 29 mm. You can see objects up to magnutude 13.3 and magnify about 250x (or anything else, because you can swich eyepieces). Price for a new one should be around $ 250,-. For the record: I have no affiliation to Sky-Watcher or any other optics selling brand.
1d
awarded  Commentator
1d
comment Is a spotting scope or binoculars a better choice for astronomy?
Why restrict yourself to a binocular/spotting scope? Did you consider buying your first telescope? S&T has two great articles to get you started on choosing your first scope, one about types of scopes and one about scopes with an exceptional price/performance. I think you'll find those articles usefull and maybe, this is the beginning of a great hobby! At least it will provide some answers to implicit questions in your original question...
Sep
4
answered During what time of the year can Centaurus be seen from Tokyo?
Sep
3
comment How to identify stars in photographs?
Complementary to this great answer, I'd like to point to Astrometry. You can upload your photo there and it will try to identify the stars on the picture. In my experience it works great. Lots of output options, like export to FITS format.
Aug
30
answered What is the exact position of the Large Magellanic Cloud?
Aug
28
comment Dealing with damp and dew whilst stargazing at night or in the early morning
+1 for "Your telescope is trying to get into thermal equilibrium with outer space."
Aug
28
comment Telescope buying guide for a beginner in India
I think the Galileioscope is a very nice piece of equipment. For the price, you get a nice scope, with good glass. Join an astronomy club, learn about the sky, for example by listening to Astronomycast.
Aug
27
comment Time after sunset until star can be seen
MODTRAN models the light from the sky. Seems a bit more complicated than just a formula. See: modtran5.com and en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/MODTRAN
Aug
27
comment Time after sunset until star can be seen
Not exacty an answer to your question, but a very nice article about daylight astronomy that shows you actually can see quite something during the day: sky.velp.info/daystars.php
Aug
10
awarded  Teacher
Aug
10
comment Is a white dwarf hotter than a Red Giant?
Yes. The residual heat of the core of the former red dwarf (millions up to a billion kelvin) is initially very much warmer than de surface temerature of the former red dwarf (up to 5000K).
Aug
10
awarded  Editor
Aug
10
revised Is a white dwarf hotter than a Red Giant?
Spelling and grammatical corrections.
Aug
10
comment Is a white dwarf hotter than a Red Giant?
Less than 5000K isn't much for a star that had a core of a billion degrees K. It doesn't have an energy source any more; only residual heat from the earlier phase of life. As stated in the Wiki link to White dwarfs: "A white dwarf is very hot when it is formed, but since it has no source of energy, it will gradually radiate away its energy and cool."
Aug
10
answered Is a white dwarf hotter than a Red Giant?
Aug
9
awarded  Supporter
Aug
5
answered Aren't there more naked-eye-visible stars in the Milky Way plane?