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 Yearling
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20h
comment Circular formation around the moon
Most likely you're not seeing circular clouds but rather the part of the clouds lit up by a circular moon.
Mar
27
comment How did water get on Earth
Well, of course the water would have been vaporized on impact. The result is water vapor, which eventually becomes rain.
Mar
1
comment What are the cloud-like blobs in the Martian southern hemisphere?
I'm not sure how I feel about questions like these. As the article says, there doesn't seem to be any consensus within the astronomical community yet on the nature of these clouds, so any answer we might give you would just be repeating speculations...
Feb
23
comment Is Blue Shift just as provable as Red Shift?
What is the context?
Feb
18
comment Did we ever actually see the earth revolving around the sun? Is the geocentric model completely disproved?
In a similar vein, we also have a couple of probes crawling around the surface of Mars at the moment, and every indication so far is that there is no argument in favor of geocentric models that wouldn't work just as well to justify a Marti-ocentric model.
Feb
7
comment If Kepler-444 planets existed for 11.2 billion years, why fear for life on Earth after six billion years?
Scientists don't fear for the Earth. They fear for the life on it, specifically for the human variety. High surface temperatures will render the Earth uninhabitable in a billion years or so, but the planet itself will be just fine for a while after that.
Feb
7
comment How do moons get captured?
And I personally would appreciate a source for the third paragraph (not because I doubt it, but because I was I was ignorant of it). I was aware of the dissipating effect of tidal forces on the Moon's spin-angular momentum, but I hadn't considered influences on orbital-angular momentum.
Feb
6
comment How do moons get captured?
Short answer: the Sun. The hyperbolic path is derived by solving the gravitational two-body problem. If Earth and Moon were the only two objects in the universe, then yes the Moon would have continued along that hyerbola. Once you add a third body into the mix, the resulting trajectories become radically more complicated.
Feb
6
comment Why there are other planets in our solar system?
@user804401 I would suggest you edit your question to make it more clear that you are asking what effects other planets might have on the earth, because that's actually an interesting question to ask.
Jan
24
comment Why don't we orbit the center of our galaxy?
Yes, the Earth is about 500 times nearer to the Moon (much closer to 400 actually), but the Sun is also 333,000 times more massive than the Earth making the Sun-Moon gravitational attraction over twice as strong. So it's actually the Sun's gravitational field which dominates the the orbit of the Moon.
Jan
18
accepted How might Thales have predicted a solar eclipse?
Jan
10
comment US observations relevant in UK?
Unless you can be more specific, the answer to your question is just going to be a big ole' "depends".
Jan
6
comment As days get longer, why isn't the added daylight split evenly between sunrise and sunset?
Also, you may be interested in this physics.SE response: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/38270/…
Jan
6
comment As days get longer, why isn't the added daylight split evenly between sunrise and sunset?
If you look that the table here, timeanddate.com/sun/usa/bend, you'll see that the time of solar noon has also drifted ahead minutes. Factoring this in, sunrise has been shifted 16+8=24 minutes earlier and sunset has been shifted 31-8=23 minutes later. So they are equivalent. ;)
Dec
7
comment Do we know the exact spot where big bang took place?
@HDE226868 I think what he's trying to ask is has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?
Nov
26
comment Why does the face of the moon 'sync' with the earth?
Actually, you can see the dark side of the moon every month during the new moon. ;)
Nov
9
awarded  Yearling
Oct
26
comment Do we get any benefit from being in a galaxy?
Well, there's at least one major long-term benefit to being in a galaxy. Civilizations living around stars in a galaxy at least have the possibility of relocating when their home dies. ;)
Oct
25
comment Evidence behind Giant Impact hypthesis
@HDE226868 I agree that point #2 is potentially the most compelling bit of evidence, but I also think associated figures and references shouldn't be omitted for this point.
Oct
10
comment Time dilation at the Big Bang
@Anixx The problem here is that closer you get to the Big Bang, the more unreliable GR becomes. At the singularity it doesn't matter what GR predicts, because without a quantum theory of gravity we have no way of trusting those predictions.