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location The South
age 23
visits member for 11 months
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1h
comment Evidence behind Giant Impact hypthesis
@HDE226868 I agree that point #2 is potentially the most compelling bit of evidence, but I also think associated figures and references shouldn't be omitted for this point.
Oct
10
comment Time dilation at the Big Bang
@Anixx The problem here is that closer you get to the Big Bang, the more unreliable GR becomes. At the singularity it doesn't matter what GR predicts, because without a quantum theory of gravity we have no way of trusting those predictions.
Oct
10
comment Age of the universe and age of stars
+1) Good job summarizing the sources of error. Since you seem to be familiar with the research, I have a question you might be able to address. The most that can be said of the two measurements from the error bars alone is that they are not inconsistent, which is why that was the extent of my comment. But I'm curious if the full findings provide enough information for us to quantify our confidence in the consistcy of the results. Did the authors happen to cover this in their paper?
Oct
9
comment Age of the universe and age of stars
Look at the error bars. 14.46-0.8=13.66, so the age of HD 140283 is not inconsistent with the age of the universe you gave.
Sep
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
8
comment Is it possible for a person to not see the new moon at different places on earth?
If you actually subject these empirical lunar calendar systems to the standards of modern data analysis, typical measurement resolutions for the date of new moons are +/- a couple of days. Now note that July 28+/-1 day includes the 29th, and vice versa. Intuitively, 29-28=1 and the dates differ by one day, but if your margin of error one day then 29-28=0 is also acceptable here. This is the main reason why "declaring the day of the New Moon" is even a thing in the first place.
Jul
15
comment Is there any point on earth where the moon stays below the horizon for an extended period of time?
You can find a moonrise/moonset calendar for the South Pole here: timeanddate.com/moon/antarctica/south-pole. You can see that the moon never stays down for more than a couple of weeks.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
19
awarded  Tumbleweed
Jun
12
asked How might Thales have predicted a solar eclipse?
Jun
1
answered Term for a momentary geometric pattern formed by astronomical objects
May
3
comment Does science need support from religion or philosophy to explain the creation?
We use science to analyze questions that philosophy and religion can't answer. Not the other way around. If religion could explain what happened before the Big Bang, it would have done so 6,000 years ago.
Apr
5
answered Density of hydrogen between galaxies
Mar
31
comment What’s the object between the earth and the sun currently showing in Google maps?
It is. Most of the sun's size in this picture is just glare.
Mar
30
answered What’s the object between the earth and the sun currently showing in Google maps?
Mar
26
comment A curious relationship between lunar periods and the solar year
It took a while to sink in but this makes much more sense now that I know I should be comparing it to the sidereal year. Thanks.
Mar
26
accepted A curious relationship between lunar periods and the solar year
Mar
24
asked A curious relationship between lunar periods and the solar year
Mar
24
comment How exactly does inflation convert random gravity fluctuations into coherent gravitational waves?
This question may get attention over at physics.stackexchange.com
Mar
8
comment Do solstices and equinoxes shift over time?
The 2003 and 2007 December solstice occurred on December 22. The 2044 and 2048 December solstice will occur on December 20. Source: timeanddate.com/calendar/seasons.html