1,363 reputation
113
bio website root42.blogspot.com
location Earth
age 35
visits member for 6 months
seen Apr 4 at 19:30

Coder, software architect, interest in computer science in general. Did research on computer graphics, ray tracing, radio wave and antenna simulation. Like to learn new programming languages. Currently doing Python and Emacs Lisp for fun. C++ for profit. Would like to learn more Clojure.


Apr
10
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
24
revised How do scientists know if an Earth-like planet is really Earth-like?
fixed grammar
Mar
19
answered What limits the usable focal length of telescopes currently?
Mar
19
comment What is the temperature of outerspace?
@RyanMcGaha From the linked WP article: The baseline temperature, as set by the background radiation (from the theorized Big Bang), is 2.7 kelvin (K).
Feb
28
comment What can be seen with a 4.5" telescope
Large Messier objects like open clusters will show lots of stars. The Orion nebula will seem like a grey, cloudy patch. The core of the Andromeda galaxy will also be a cloudy patch. The large globular clusters like M13 will appear as lots of stars in a sphere.
Feb
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Why does e.g. Hubble's secondary mirror not block part of the picture?
Feb
25
answered How would light from a blue or red star affect the way we see?
Dec
20
comment How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
Thanks. If you think this answers your question, you may accept the answer.
Dec
19
comment How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
I've added a 24 hour animation to my answer, which shows the rotation.
Dec
19
revised How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
added 199 characters in body
Dec
19
revised How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
added 150 characters in body
Dec
19
comment What can be seen with a 4.5" telescope
Then you can definitely take on the planets, since you will have about a meter of focal length. You should Start out with a 10mm eyepiece, and later buy a Barlow lens, or better: buy a good 8mm or 5mm eyepiece. The last may be expensive or not very suitable anymore for your telescope, though.
Dec
19
comment How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
The map shows the sky above you. Easiest to understand if you lie down on the ground, head facing north and then holding the map in front of you. The zenith is in the middle of the map, north is where polaris is (i.e. top part of the map). East and west are reversed, because its an overhead map. So west is right, and east is left.
Dec
19
answered What can be seen with a 4.5" telescope
Dec
19
answered How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
Dec
16
comment What are some night sky objects I could see with my Celestron UpClose 20x50 Porro Binocular?
Update: It seems there is a similar book being done by the same publisher: oculum.de/sites/deepskyatlas/site/dsa.asp -- May be worth checking out.
Dec
16
comment What are some night sky objects I could see with my Celestron UpClose 20x50 Porro Binocular?
There used to be a very good reference guide for this: Deep Sky Travel Atlas. I have it, however I think it is out of print and it was also in German. It's mostly maps and tables, so the language is not so important... It marks objects as being suitable for binoculars or small telescopes.
Dec
15
answered What are some night sky objects I could see with my Celestron UpClose 20x50 Porro Binocular?
Dec
10
comment Coordinate transformations between reference frames in spherical astronomy
I am rather sure now. Please correct me if I'm wrong -- edited the answer accordingly.