1,548 reputation
316
bio website root42.blogspot.com
location Earth
age 35
visits member for 1 year, 2 months
seen Nov 13 at 8:15

Coder, software architect, interest in computer science in general. Did research on computer graphics, ray tracing, radio wave and antenna simulation. Like to learn new programming languages. Currently doing Python and Emacs Lisp for fun. C++ for profit. Would like to learn more Clojure.


Dec
19
comment How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
I've added a 24 hour animation to my answer, which shows the rotation.
Dec
19
revised How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
added 199 characters in body
Dec
19
revised How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
added 150 characters in body
Dec
19
comment What can be seen with a 4.5" telescope
Then you can definitely take on the planets, since you will have about a meter of focal length. You should Start out with a 10mm eyepiece, and later buy a Barlow lens, or better: buy a good 8mm or 5mm eyepiece. The last may be expensive or not very suitable anymore for your telescope, though.
Dec
19
comment How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
The map shows the sky above you. Easiest to understand if you lie down on the ground, head facing north and then holding the map in front of you. The zenith is in the middle of the map, north is where polaris is (i.e. top part of the map). East and west are reversed, because its an overhead map. So west is right, and east is left.
Dec
19
answered What can be seen with a 4.5" telescope
Dec
19
answered How does the Milky Way look like above 66° North and below 66° South?
Dec
16
comment What are some night sky objects I could see with my Celestron UpClose 20x50 Porro Binocular?
Update: It seems there is a similar book being done by the same publisher: oculum.de/sites/deepskyatlas/site/dsa.asp -- May be worth checking out.
Dec
16
comment What are some night sky objects I could see with my Celestron UpClose 20x50 Porro Binocular?
There used to be a very good reference guide for this: Deep Sky Travel Atlas. I have it, however I think it is out of print and it was also in German. It's mostly maps and tables, so the language is not so important... It marks objects as being suitable for binoculars or small telescopes.
Dec
15
answered What are some night sky objects I could see with my Celestron UpClose 20x50 Porro Binocular?
Dec
10
comment Coordinate transformations between reference frames in spherical astronomy
I am rather sure now. Please correct me if I'm wrong -- edited the answer accordingly.
Dec
10
comment Coordinate transformations between reference frames in spherical astronomy
Reading this, I am not quite sure if maybe the $r'$ needs to be multiplied instead, since it represents a scaling...
Dec
10
answered Coordinate transformations between reference frames in spherical astronomy
Nov
22
comment Will Neptune be visible with the naked eye if I am standing on its satellite
If my estimates are roughly correct, you will see it in color. $10^2cd/m^2$ are, as I said, in the range of photopic (color) vision of humans.
Nov
21
comment What is the distance that the Moon travels during one orbit around the Earth?
@leonardvertighel ok, so orbits are linear and/or additive? I was wondering that. I thought it might be a bit more complicated, since orbits are a function of time, and the orbits are not simple, linear functions.
Nov
20
revised Will Neptune be visible with the naked eye if I am standing on its satellite
added 135 characters in body
Nov
20
answered Will Neptune be visible with the naked eye if I am standing on its satellite
Nov
20
comment What is the distance that the Moon travels during one orbit around the Earth?
Good point! Though I still don't quite know how to calculate it. :)
Nov
20
comment What is the distance that the Moon travels during one orbit around the Earth?
Yes, I thought of a similar thing. Wikipedia states that the orbit of the Moon around the Sun is convex however, since the Sun's influence is much greater than the Earth's influence. So I don't know if a helix would be a good approximation... Maybe for the Sun/Jupiter/Ganymede system...?
Nov
20
comment What is the distance that the Moon travels during one orbit around the Earth?
What if you want to know the motion of the moon around the sun? How would you compute that?