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Sep
3
awarded  Commentator
Sep
3
awarded  Supporter
Sep
3
comment Time after sunset until star can be seen
and where. If there's a lot of artificial light around, you may never see any but the brightest stars.
Sep
3
comment Are there stars that don't emit visible light?
I've seen in the past some sources suggesting Jupiter may be or become one of your first category stars. It emits a lot of radiation, but no visible light.
Sep
3
comment The Existence of Natural Satellites in Geostationary Orbits
tidal locking isn't the same as being in GEO. In GEO the moon would always be in the same point in the sky, which it isn't.
Sep
3
comment The Existence of Natural Satellites in Geostationary Orbits
@EtiennePellegrini if the orbit isn't stable (and GEO orbits aren't) it's highly unlikely that a natural satellite is going to survive in that orbit for very long. It'd be pulled or pushed out over time and either crash into its primary, take up a different orbit, or be pushed out of orbit completely.
Sep
3
answered Could the universe have evolved differently?
May
14
comment Could there be life beneath the surface of Mars or moons?
@Jonathan to quote Mr Spock: "it's life Jim, but not as we know it" ;)
May
14
comment Can impact craters on the moon act like giant radio telescopes?
@FlorinAndrei a lunar-stationary orbit, if it's even possible given the proximity of the moon to the earth, would not be close to the surface.
May
14
comment Do heavier elements breakdown during supernova?
and in addition to Cheeku's comment, radiation pressure also tends to drive matter out from the center of a star.
May
14
answered Could there be life beneath the surface of Mars or moons?
Mar
3
comment Why can't I see Mars clearly?
just opening the window won't do all that much, as you're causing a mix of warm and cold air in front of the telescope, but atmospheric blooming at its worst.
Dec
10
comment How would we detect an Earth doppelganger planet?
@called2voyage I'm nowhere saying they are, but the same principle holds for every other signal as well (unless you claim to have a way to send out a type of signal that does not degrade in strength over interstellar distances AND can be detected by us).
Dec
9
comment How would we detect an Earth doppelganger planet?
@JordanBrown detect it has intelligent life NOW? No. Speed of light makes that impossible. Detect it might at some point have had intelligent life? Only if they sent out incredibly strong signals (way beyond what we're doing, and as our technology improves what we send out gets weaker as we're moving away from omnidirectional EM transmissions) and/or is very, very close.
Dec
6
comment How would we detect an Earth doppelganger planet?
you want to detect something that's identical to us, assumption is they're identical to us right now...
Dec
6
awarded  Teacher
Dec
6
answered How would we detect an Earth doppelganger planet?
Dec
6
comment How would we detect an Earth doppelganger planet?
@JordanBrown any planet the size of earth would be extremely difficult to detect, yes. Any civilisation on the level of our own on such a planet would be impossible to detect with any sensors we possess.