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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 14 votes cast
Apr
16
awarded  Custodian
Apr
16
reviewed Leave Open Why does Mars' experience an 'ice age' at high axis obliquity, when Earth experiences an ice age at low axis obliquity
Apr
15
awarded  Informed
Mar
13
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
30
comment earth is spherical , does it mean the ground on earth is like a ball?
How is the relative direction of "down" relevant to the shape of the Earth? This seems like an entirely separate question.
Jan
30
answered earth is spherical , does it mean the ground on earth is like a ball?
Jan
6
revised Is there an element of chance/chaos in stellar evolution?
grammar, clarity
Jan
6
revised Working with high-magnification eye-pieces
Added information.
Jan
6
answered Working with high-magnification eye-pieces
Jan
5
revised Lack of contact with Aliens
Added supporting facts.
Jan
5
comment Is there an element of chance/chaos in stellar evolution?
@zibadawatimmy Yes, I would say those are good examples of trivial by any definition. Even if your question was "Is this likely to ever happen anywhere in the known universe?" the answer is still no with a trivial degree of uncertainty. Trivial means information that is of little importance or value.
Jan
5
answered Is there an element of chance/chaos in stellar evolution?
Jan
5
answered What are dark matter and dark energy?
Dec
9
answered Lack of contact with Aliens
Dec
8
awarded  Populist
Dec
6
awarded  Yearling
Dec
3
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
3
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
2
comment How does the Earth move in the sky as seen from the Moon?
@jean No. The "dark" side of the moon is not actually dark all of the time. We just never see it (other than when we fly a spaceship around to the other side). The same side of the moon always faces Earth, but as the moon revolves around the Earth, which takes just over 4 weeks, the sun shines on different sides of the moon. When we on Earth see a full moon, that is because the sun and the moon are on opposite sides of Earth. So the side facing us is fully lit. At new moon, the moon is on the same side as the sun, so our side of the moon is dark, but the "dark" side is actually fully lit.
Dec
2
awarded  Editor