443 reputation
139
bio website
location Colorado
age
visits member for 1 year
seen Dec 15 at 14:37

My degree was in Applied Mathematics with a minor in Computer Science. I've been a software developer since 2004; C# is my primary language recently. My greatest software interest is in the field is Artificial Intelligence. I have been interested in space exploration as long as I can remember. I hope that we can become a truly space-faring race one day, which is just not realistically possible without solving some daunting engineering challenges. So among my keenest interests are ideas that reduce the energy required for escape velocity, like space elevators, or ways to harness and expend much more energy without destroying the planet.


Dec
9
answered Lack of contact with Aliens
Dec
8
awarded  Populist
Dec
6
awarded  Yearling
Dec
3
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
3
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
2
comment How does the Earth move in the sky as seen from the Moon?
@jean No. The "dark" side of the moon is not actually dark all of the time. We just never see it (other than when we fly a spaceship around to the other side). The same side of the moon always faces Earth, but as the moon revolves around the Earth, which takes just over 4 weeks, the sun shines on different sides of the moon. When we on Earth see a full moon, that is because the sun and the moon are on opposite sides of Earth. So the side facing us is fully lit. At new moon, the moon is on the same side as the sun, so our side of the moon is dark, but the "dark" side is actually fully lit.
Dec
2
awarded  Editor
Dec
2
revised How does the Earth move in the sky as seen from the Moon?
Added link to etymology of the word planet (originally meaning wanderer).
Dec
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
1
comment Why isn't the moon dark in a solar eclipse?
Astrological is fortune-telling, horoscopes, etc. I think you are looking for an astronomical term. I'm not aware of a term for exactly what you are describing.
Dec
1
awarded  Supporter
Dec
1
awarded  Teacher
Dec
1
answered How does the Earth move in the sky as seen from the Moon?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Mar
18
accepted Does anyone know why three of Jupiter's largest moons orbit in 1:2:4 resonance?
Mar
18
comment Does anyone know why three of Jupiter's largest moons orbit in 1:2:4 resonance?
The link in the comments above describes why resonance holds, but this is a beautiful revelation of why orbiting bodies are likely to find that resonance to begin with.
Dec
12
awarded  Critic
Dec
12
awarded  Scholar
Dec
12
accepted Is there any telescope on Earth that can see the lunar rovers on the moon?
Dec
12
awarded  Citizen Patrol