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Stack Exchange Valued Associate #00005

I am the Director of Community Development for the Stack Exchange Network.

I can be reached at
rcartaino@stackexchange.com


Jul
2
reviewed No Action Needed Point Spread Function size: Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) vs Sigma
Jul
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Burning Out Stars
Jun
30
reviewed No Action Needed Naive star filter visible at night in certain country
Jun
26
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
added 1 character in body
Jun
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is the physics of a gas mass subject to gravity in space?
Jun
26
revised What is the farthest object we've been able to bounce signals off of to date?
edited title
Jun
26
revised What is the farthest object we've been able to bounce signals off of to date?
edited title
Jun
24
awarded  Custodian
Jun
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Was the progress of astronomy in the 1800s surprisingly slow, and if so why?
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How are black holes doors to other universes?
Jun
12
revised What is the difference between gas and dust in astronomy?
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Jun
12
revised What is the difference between gas and dust in astronomy?
[Edit removed during grace period]; deleted 40 characters in body
Jun
12
answered What is the difference between gas and dust in astronomy?
Jun
5
comment If Mars orbited the Earth how distant would it have to be to cause the same tides?
What do you mean by "same tides"? Any two bodies orbiting each other are going to cause "tidal effects", so the answer might be doesn't matter, all orbiting bodies will cause tidal effects like the moon. But if you are looking for a system that causes the same amplitude, or the same time frequency, or the same distribution of diurnal/semi-diurnal tides; or if you you asking about tidal effects on just oceans or other systems — or all of the above — working out the orbital mechanics becomes a bigger challenge. What is it you are trying to solve for?
May
29
comment What percentage of visual stars are actually binary stars?
Point of clarification: "Double stars" refers to two stars that are visually very close together so they appear as one by the naked eye. But that doesn't necessarily mean they are binary stars. Do you have a preference?
May
20
comment golden and red colored light even after Sunset
The "golden hour" is a term used in photography — en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_hour_%28photography%29. While it is caused by the scattering and refraction of light in the atmosphere, this isn't really on topic for a site about astronomical observations and astrophysics. You may want to try the Photography site, or possibly Physics SE. Sorry about the confusion. Good luck!
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
added 21 characters in body
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
deleted 37 characters in body
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
deleted 24 characters in body