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Jun
24
awarded  Custodian
Jun
24
reviewed Approve Was the progress of astronomy in the 1800s surprisingly slow, and if so why?
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
16
reviewed Approve How are black holes doors to other universes?
Jun
12
revised What is the difference between gas and dust in astronomy?
added 12 characters in body
Jun
12
revised What is the difference between gas and dust in astronomy?
[Edit removed during grace period]; deleted 40 characters in body
Jun
12
answered What is the difference between gas and dust in astronomy?
Jun
5
comment If Mars orbited the Earth how distant would it have to be to cause the same tides?
What do you mean by "same tides"? Any two bodies orbiting each other are going to cause "tidal effects", so the answer might be doesn't matter, all orbiting bodies will cause tidal effects like the moon. But if you are looking for a system that causes the same amplitude, or the same time frequency, or the same distribution of diurnal/semi-diurnal tides; or if you you asking about tidal effects on just oceans or other systems — or all of the above — working out the orbital mechanics becomes a bigger challenge. What is it you are trying to solve for?
May
29
comment What percentage of visual stars are actually binary stars?
Point of clarification: "Double stars" refers to two stars that are visually very close together so they appear as one by the naked eye. But that doesn't necessarily mean they are binary stars. Do you have a preference?
May
20
comment golden and red colored light even after Sunset
The "golden hour" is a term used in photography — en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_hour_%28photography%29. While it is caused by the scattering and refraction of light in the atmosphere, this isn't really on topic for a site about astronomical observations and astrophysics. You may want to try the Photography site, or possibly Physics SE. Sorry about the confusion. Good luck!
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
added 21 characters in body
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
deleted 37 characters in body
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
deleted 24 characters in body
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
edited body
May
19
revised Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
added 58 characters in body
May
19
answered Do we make predictions in our time, or local time?
May
14
comment How many earths fit in the observable universe?
Your answer assumes we are pulverizing the earth to completely fill the volume of a universe-sized container. Without getting into the complicated math behind forming optimal latices of congruent spheres, you should multiply your answer by a factor of pi/(3*sqrt(2)) or about 0.74048. The Kepler Conjecture says that is the highest density that can be achieved by any arrangement of spheres. Oh, and since the observable universe is also expanding at an accelerated rate, you should also update your answer every few hundred millions years just to be safe. Just saying.
Apr
30
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
30
reviewed Reject If Earth didn't rotate, would we feel heavier?
Apr
30
reviewed Approve Why is Mars' atmosphere so thin?