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Stack Exchange Valued Associate #00005

I am the Director of Community Development for the Stack Exchange Network.

I can be reached at
rcartaino@stackexchange.com


Jul
22
comment Can we hear something on Venus, Mars and Titan?
These comments should really to be posted as 'answers'? Thanks.
Jul
21
comment How does a gravity slingshot actually work?
@LocalFluff You should post your comment as a proper answer. Comments are used to ask for clarification or otherwise improve the post, but comments do not allow the vetting that comes with voting and wiki-style editing that an answer provides. Thanks.
Jul
14
comment Alt-Az or Polar?
It would be nice if we can get this fleshed out as an actual 'answer' below. Thanks. (cc @asawyer)
Jun
5
comment If Mars orbited the Earth how distant would it have to be to cause the same tides?
What do you mean by "same tides"? Any two bodies orbiting each other are going to cause "tidal effects", so the answer might be doesn't matter, all orbiting bodies will cause tidal effects like the moon. But if you are looking for a system that causes the same amplitude, or the same time frequency, or the same distribution of diurnal/semi-diurnal tides; or if you you asking about tidal effects on just oceans or other systems — or all of the above — working out the orbital mechanics becomes a bigger challenge. What is it you are trying to solve for?
May
29
comment What percentage of visual stars are actually binary stars?
Point of clarification: "Double stars" refers to two stars that are visually very close together so they appear as one by the naked eye. But that doesn't necessarily mean they are binary stars. Do you have a preference?
May
20
comment golden and red colored light even after Sunset
The "golden hour" is a term used in photography — en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_hour_%28photography%29. While it is caused by the scattering and refraction of light in the atmosphere, this isn't really on topic for a site about astronomical observations and astrophysics. You may want to try the Photography site, or possibly Physics SE. Sorry about the confusion. Good luck!
May
14
comment How many earths fit in the observable universe?
Your answer assumes we are pulverizing the earth to completely fill the volume of a universe-sized container. Without getting into the complicated math behind forming optimal latices of congruent spheres, you should multiply your answer by a factor of pi/(3*sqrt(2)) or about 0.74048. The Kepler Conjecture says that is the highest density that can be achieved by any arrangement of spheres. Oh, and since the observable universe is also expanding at an accelerated rate, you should also update your answer every few hundred millions years just to be safe. Just saying.
Apr
7
comment “How the Universe Works”: is it scientifically accurate?
What concept specifically are you concerned about? I don't think you can declare an entire series of material covering hundreds of topics broadly either scientifically sound or bunk. There's no useful information to be had from that. What are you asking about specifically?
Apr
1
comment What is the minimum mass required so that objects become spherical due to its own gravity?
You would have to define "objects." Icy bodies start to become round under their own gravity at a certain mass. Rocky planets will take more. Liquids would form a sphere with miniscule mass as I assume gas proto-planets would be round as soon as they have enough gravity to be considered an "object."
Feb
20
comment What is that void that the universe is growing into?
If someone is up to speed on the current state of "we really don't know" -ness, please feel free to add that as an answer.
Feb
16
comment If NASA is going to capture an asteroid with a spacecraft, wouldn't a UFO be able to manuever a celestial body?
This question appears to be off-topic because it it not about the subject of astronomy as defined in the Help Center
Feb
13
comment Class presentation on the Sun, ideas?
@Sawarnik chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/815/the-observatory. It's a bit quiet because this is still a new site.
Feb
13
comment Class presentation on the Sun, ideas?
Another way to say this is that this site is designed to create a work of reference to answer questions about the field of astronomy. We'd love to help, but a more appropriate place for your discussion is perhaps in our chat room, or even better, a threaded discussion forum that supports more generalized discussion. And, yes... good luck!
Jan
16
comment How Far Are We From the Edge of the Universe?
If it helps, this is really just a corollary to this question: Where is the center of the universe?
Jan
13
comment Will new stars stop forming at some point of time?
@called2voyage Brian Cox did a nice show on this in his "Wonders of the Universe" series, but if I recall, he got a bit poetic in specifying the time frames involved. Basically a really really really long time.
Dec
19
comment Timeline of falling into a blackhole
Thanks for the information, but in the context of this site, it would be better to provide an answer here. It's okay to add links for further reading, but this site was created to build a definitive collection of answers to astronomy questions. When someone comes here looking for answers through search, the last thing we should be doing is sending them elsewhere to find that information. Link-only answers do little more than add another barrier between future readers and the actual information they are looking for. That's not making the Internet better.
Dec
16
comment If the hammer and feather move at the same speed why do comet and the tail particles move at different speeds?
The ejection speed of the comet material is negligible compared to the solar winds carrying it into space. So while it does impart a bit of velocity, it does not explain the "slow down and fall away as it disintegrates" effect the author is asking about.
Dec
8
comment How to build a powerful home made telescope
It would not be possible to actually answer how to build a powerful telescope in this type of Q&A. I would suggest doing a bit of research to get started and ask questions about specific problems you may encounter.
Dec
6
comment iteration to cover the whole sky with right ascension, declination, angle
@Envite Do you happen to know the percentage of overlap you get with this configuration? In other words, how much of the analysis would be redundant/wasted if you were forced to analyze the entire field with each step?
Dec
4
comment What is the maximum transmission distance of the radio signal in the outer space which could still be understood?
This feels somewhat empty and unsatisfying. The entire field of Astronomy is about measuring and theorizing about places we have never been. Surely we know something about the physics of radio signals in a vacuum and can surmise the effects of interstellar space on signal degradation. Maybe the author didn't provide enough information to define the problem, but saying "don't know because we haven't been there yet" just feels a bit lacking. No offense; I just don't think your opening premise is correct.