1,437 reputation
431
bio website reddit.com/r/religion
location Georgia, USA
age 23
visits member for 11 months
seen 32 mins ago

I'm a Software Engineer for a well-known aerospace and defense industry company. Since my promotion last year, I've been working with a flight simulation lab.

Before working for my current employer, I worked for four years as an IT Technician for a college campus.

I've been running RPGs of many types since about 2003. I've been a player, a GM, and a moderator many times. As a GM and moderator most of my experience is with freeform, text-based, play-by-post RPGs. I have also LARPed a few times, and I have some experience with traditional tabletop RPGs. Most of my tabletop experience is with Pathfinder.

I'm also an amateur novelist and poet, and when I get the chance I work on my large story universe or one of my short stories. My wife and I are also working on a book series together.


Aug
13
comment Name of area close to Local Bubble?
Also, what looks like the boundary of a bubble from a 2D perspective may not actually be the boundary. In your original image, the orange-yellow strip between Hyades and Betelgeuse where the "Local Bubble" label rests may not be a boundary. There may be a cavity above and/or below that line of density which connects the cavities on either side of it. Notice in this 3D representation of the Local Bubble that it is has an amorphous boundary.
Aug
13
comment Name of area close to Local Bubble?
Part of the problem here probably lies in the fact that we are looking at 2D projections of 3D space.
Jul
28
comment is there any theory or observational evidence that our universe is electrically neutral or not?
Upon further review of this topic, I see no reason why this question should be considered unclear or off-topic. It is a question with an abundantly clear premise (as alluded to in the paper linked by the OP) and it is certainly firmly within the realm of cosmology which is on topic.
Jul
23
revised Does the universe have an edge?
edited tags
Jul
23
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Do planetary radio frequency change upon alignments?
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Classification of a Comet
Jul
18
accepted How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
Jul
18
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
17
awarded  Self-Learner
Jul
17
comment How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
@TracyCramer I know that you deleted your comment, so you may have realized that your question isn't valid. Earth's geographic pole does not swap. It's magnetic poles can swap, but that does not affect which side of Earth we consider North or South, magnetically or geographically.
Jul
17
comment How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
@CraigConstantine Since you insisted, I have posted my own answer. I can accept it tomorrow.
Jul
17
answered How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
Jul
17
comment How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
@CraigConstantine You're free to steal my info. Besides, the right-hand rule is right for planetoids.
Jul
16
comment Can two comets travel together as one?
@Takku It is possible that some of them formed from collision or mutual capture in the earlier stages of Solar System formation when there was a relatively thicker cloud of ice and dust: solarsystem.nasa.gov/faq/index.cfm?Category=Comets#q3.
Jul
16
comment How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
Dwarf planets, minor planets, their satellites, and comets do follow the right-hand rule, though.
Jul
16
comment How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
Now I've found it on Wikipedia as well: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poles_of_astronomical_bodies
Jul
16
comment How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
Relevant portion: "The north pole is that pole of rotation that lies on the north side of the invariable plane of the solar system." The north of the invariable plane is the side that Earth's North pole points to.
Jul
16
comment How were the designations of “North” and “South” applied to the hemispheres of Mars?
It appears the IAU actually defines north differently: download.springer.com/static/pdf/49/…