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programming numerical algorithms for astrophysical applications.


Sep
3
comment Can the Gaia telescope detect small temporarily captured asteroids near its Lagrange orbit?
Your answer is wrong. The question considered asteroids near Earth's L1 point. Trojans are near L4 and L5. Detectability of the latter doesn't imply that of the former, even if they existed.
Sep
3
comment Can the Gaia telescope detect small temporarily captured asteroids near its Lagrange orbit?
A small object reflects less light and my be below the significance limit of the CCD. From a single scan one only knows "there was something there in this direction" (which is accurate in one dimension and inaccurate in the other), but god know what. This is not a detection.
Sep
2
comment Is there a paper on galaxy mergers in clusters of galaxies?
Actually, asking us for a good reference for something is a bit cheeky. I would think that you should go and search for yourself. It's unlikely that anybody here will know an up-to-date answer without searching. And, don't trust those simulations...
Sep
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is there a paper on galaxy mergers in clusters of galaxies?
Sep
2
answered Fate of the Spiral Arms of the Milky Way and Andromeda
Sep
2
comment Thought experiment about the outskirts of the universe
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about astronomy. Moving faster than the speed of light is unphysical nonsense.
Sep
2
comment Thought experiment about the outskirts of the universe
Let's assume ... a ship that travels in infinite speed This is a astronomy not a fantasy site. Nothing moves faster than the speed of light and no insight can be gained by assuming the opposite.
Sep
2
revised Thought experiment about the outskirts of the universe
edited title
Sep
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Thought experiment about the outskirts of the universe
Sep
2
answered Questions about spiral galaxy arms
Sep
2
answered Mechanism for Brown Dwarf Fusion
Sep
2
answered Could the universe have evolved differently?
Sep
2
revised Determining effect of small variable force on planetary perihelion precession
major re-write, adding change of periapse
Sep
2
revised Determining effect of small variable force on planetary perihelion precession
re-organised the algebra
Sep
2
revised Determining effect of small variable force on planetary perihelion precession
deleted 10 characters in body
Sep
1
answered Determining effect of small variable force on planetary perihelion precession
Sep
1
comment Determining effect of small variable force on planetary perihelion precession
What confuses me here is the word "transverse". I think what you mean is 'azimuthal' (or perhaps 'tangential'). For me, transverse means "perpendicular to the direction of motion", but that's quite different from what you meant.
Sep
1
comment Determining effect of small variable force on planetary perihelion precession
There is a difference between your question here and that on mathematics (and physics): here the transverse acceleration is proportional to the radial acceleration and $K$ is a dimensionless number, there the radial acceleration has no effect on the transverse acceleration and $K$ must be an acceleration (though you talk about a 'number').
Sep
1
comment Determining effect of small variable force on planetary perihelion precession
Yes, there are approximate analytical methods (perturbation theory), valid in the limit of $K\ll1$. Perhaps you can clarify your question a bit. What's the direction of the transverse acceleration (I understand 'transverse' to mean perpendicular to the instantaneous velocity, but it's not clear whether the acceleration is in the plane of the orbit or perpendicular or a mixture).
Aug
29
comment What is the relative time difference between us and a star system in outer layer of our galaxy?
This plot is not the rotation curve of the Milky Way, which is less accurately known (mainly because we are observing it from within, making these type of measurements difficult).