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 Yearling
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Jun
8
comment What would happen if a wormhole gets swallowed by a black hole?
I don't think you can differentiate between the two ends of a wormhole. Both ends would be the same - i.e. it's non-orientable. If there is a black hole next to a wormhole, would not the gravitational effects of the other black hole also work through the wormhole itself?
Jun
8
comment What would happen if a wormhole gets swallowed by a black hole?
@HDE226868 Didn't Einstein predict wormholes? If you're being nitpicking - we don't even know that black holes exist. For all you know, we're all being emulated inside a computer.
Jun
8
comment What if the black hole in the center of the galaxy grew faster?
Some people have speculated that black holes are worm-holes. Could not a black hole grow from both "ends"?
Jun
8
comment What if the black hole in the center of the galaxy grew faster?
@RobJeffries This is also not a forum for being arrogant. The question is not imaginary and the visual effects that this would cause is what's interresting.
Jun
5
comment What if the black hole in the center of the galaxy grew faster?
@RobJeffries It may be difficult to imagine this with a black hole. I suggest another object; the "Strangeularity" in the center of the milky way. It increases in mass continously, due to the "Weirdness Effect". Being in vincinity of something like this; would we see a gradual change in the redshift of for example M31?
Jan
6
awarded  Yearling
Sep
1
comment World line coordinate finiteness
Finally; I fully adopt the notion that time and space is exactly the same. This implies that also physical distance is four dimensional, allowing us to observe particles as not being at the same "spot" i.e. have a physical shape - while another observer may see it as a singularity.
Sep
1
comment What is the probability that there is life on other planets?
Drakes equation should take relativity into account... It'll significantly reduce the chances for life existing elsewhere; as seen by us.
Sep
1
comment World line coordinate finiteness
@HDE226868 It seems obvious that at crossing the event horizon an object is "spaghettified" recursively until you're left with the tiniest of particles, or perhaps some energy/particle hybrid. Eventually that particle will reach the center of the singularity, and the spaghetification will be working internally on the particle more than externally. This will look like universal shrinking, which I believe is indistinguishable from an accelerating universal expansion - leading to a big freeze. In any direction, you're looking at the center of the black hole we originally entered - leading to CBR.
Aug
28
comment World line coordinate finiteness
@HDE226868 There are many observed effects that I believe can be explained by such a "sub universe". For example accelerating universal expansion, isotropy of cosmic background radiation, big freeze seems a natural consequence,
Aug
28
comment World line coordinate finiteness
@hde226868 It depends on your perspective on the universe. I believe "our" universe is simply the center of a black hole in a much older and larger universe. New energy can certainly be introduced into such a "sub universe", without violating the law of conservation of energy. You can of course argue that I'm not talking about the "grand universe" then - but for all intents and purposes we can't exit this black hole I believe we're inside. Thus, for us it will be the universe.
Aug
27
asked World line coordinate finiteness
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
15
revised A black “superhole” possibility?
Rewrote parts of my question to make it more clear what I am asking about.
May
15
comment A black “superhole” possibility?
@StanLiou When you consider a gravity well that is infinitely small, at one time a single particle could touch both sides. At that point, to me - it sounds reasonable to assume that the particle itself shrinks. If the shrinking makes the particle so small, that it's size is too small to be "spaghettified", and it continues to shrink I think we could expect something similar to the big bang all over again. If we consider this scenario to be true, we should be able to watch our own universe and see for signs that this may be true.
May
14
comment A black “superhole” possibility?
@BlackbodyBlacklight I'm not talking about when you approach. I'm talking about when you're in the absolute center of it. When your own center becomes one with the black hole center, tidal forces only compress you - they can't rip you apart.
May
14
comment A black “superhole” possibility?
@BlackbodyBlacklight That's just something I intuitively believe - local forces working matter inside, will eventually become much more important the tidal forces emitted from the superhole. This as a result of the assumption that particles themselves become smaller after billions of years inside a black hole. Also; I'm talking about the possibility of our observable universe being inside a black superhole. I think the post belongs here.
May
14
comment A black “superhole” possibility?
I'm pretty sure many of the extremely well educated astro*/cosmo* people on this site will tell me that this is a stupid idea, either because it's just speculation - or because nothing suggests that it is true. I've asked a lot of questions and nothing so far suggests to me it's NOT a viable direction to explore, if I were to try to take a PhD Cosmology.
May
14
asked A black “superhole” possibility?
May
14
comment Why do we have the cosmological constant?
@called2voyage Okay, fair enough. Imagining a universe inside a singularity, requires everything to be on the same place when viewed from outside - but viewed from within, affected by time dilution and other GR effects perhaps doesn't require a center.