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seen Jul 25 at 17:43

Jul
25
comment Perception of an objects history passing as an observer moves toward it
You will see time dilated by gamma = 1/sqrroot(1-v^2/c^2), factor so if you substitute this values it will take you 60 years to reach that star. and it squares all the things. I'm having trouble with this part. Doesn't make much sense.
Jun
23
revised Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
added 418 characters in body
Jun
22
comment Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
I'm still hoping for a better answer.
Jun
22
answered Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
Jun
22
revised Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
added 85 characters in body
Jun
22
awarded  Custodian
Jun
22
awarded  Editor
Jun
22
revised Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
edited body
Jun
22
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
Jun
22
awarded  Student
Jun
22
comment Parking a telescope at a Lagrange point: is this a good idea from a debris point of view?
L4 and L5 are stable.
Jun
22
comment Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
@ Carl There is a supermassive black hole in the center of milky way. Other black holes are spread out in the entire galaxy with the same distribution as the regular stars, only that there is less of them.
Jun
21
asked Statistically, what would the average distance of the closest black hole be?
Jun
13
comment Where can I find a catalog of all stars in the Milky Way?
@Axiverse Hard code the most known stars, and randomly/procedurally generate the rest. I hope to play you game someday.
Jun
13
comment Where can I find a catalog of all stars in the Milky Way?
@Cheeku I missed that. :(
Jun
12
comment How many planets do on average different star types support?
I don't think there is any theoretical limit how many planets can orbit a celestial object.
Jun
9
comment How can the 13.8 billion years old universe have a radius of 46 billion light years?
@Yashbhatt You should really do this: astronomy.stackexchange.com/questions/ask
Jun
9
comment How can the 13.8 billion years old universe have a radius of 46 billion light years?
@Yashbhatt I don't understand what are you asking.
Jun
8
answered How can the 13.8 billion years old universe have a radius of 46 billion light years?
May
26
awarded  Commentator